116aobesity2010SLecture2Workingcopy

116aobesity2010SLecture2Workingcopy - OBESITY LECTURE 1...

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1 OBESITY LECTURE 1 (cont’d) September 29, 2010 Consumer Economics of French Fries McDonalds fries (JSS Spring 2004) McValue: $0.99 Small: $1.15 Save $0.16 Get extra 110 kcals If do this daily, gain 1 lb in one month Pricing Encourages Consumption Q: “Do you want to super size it?” A: Why do I want to super size me? How do we convince the consumer that the extra value is not in super sizing food portions? New Organization Proposed M.A.S.S. (mothers against supersizing) Mc Donald’s no longer super sizes
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2 OBESITY LECTURE 2 and 3 October 1, 2010 Managing the Problem Obesity is a chronic disease Chronic diseases require chronic treatment Treatment must be individualized May simply stabilize weight People with co-morbidities need more aggressive treatment Heart disease Hypertension Type 2 diabetes Sleep apnea… Some Medical Consequences of Obesity Inflammation Hyperlipidemia Metabolic syndrome – e.g. Glucose intolerance; type 2 diabetes Fatty liver Gall stones (also associated with weight loss in adolescents) Early maturation Hypertension, sleep apnea………. .
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3 Medical Management MD plays integral role in initiating discussions regarding body weight. Potential Problems Limited resources. time, knowledge Options Nurses, Dietitians and Nutritionists Commercial Programs, Internet-based Programs Summary Obesity impacts all areas of Medicine Inter disciplinary team Medical treatment: M.D., R.N R.D. and/or nutritionist whenever possible someone trained in physical activity, someone trained in behavior modification Suggested Practical Tips Increase activity levels-pedometer Make a healthy choice with each meal, Try one or two changes at a time Food and exercise Logs Prevalence of Overweight Children and Adolescents 13% children age 6-11 and 14 % adolescents age 12-19 Statistics, 2001 ) . Between 1980 and 1994, children and adolescents considered to be overweight (BMI-for-age > 95th percentile) increased by 100%. Overweight youth are more likely to be overweight as adults, and they are more likely to have medical risks associated with CVD
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4 Assessment Medical history Family history Dietary assessment Physical activity assessment Physical examination Psychological assessment – readiness to change (both children/adolescents and parents) Adults CHILDREN
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5 Individualized Family’s acknowledge problem Family's readiness for change Family support Financial concerns Neighborhood characteristics (access to play areas and grocery stores). Unless situation is understood fully,
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116aobesity2010SLecture2Workingcopy - OBESITY LECTURE 1...

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