JADA%202010PP_NutritionInterventionHIV

JADA%202010PP_NutritionInterventionHIV - from the...

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from the association Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition Intervention and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection ABSTRACT It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that efforts to optimize nutri- tional status through individualized medical nutrition therapy, assurance of food and nutrition security, and nutrition education are essential to the total sys- tem of health care available to people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection throughout the contin- uum of care. Broad-based efforts to im- prove health care access and treatment have stabilized HIV prevalence levels in many parts of the world and led to longer survival for people living with HIV infec- tion. Confounding clinical and social is- sues, such as medication interactions, co- morbidities, wasting, lipodystrophy, food insecurity, aging, and other related con- ditions further complicate disease man- agement. With greater understanding of the mechanisms of HIV disease and its impact on body function, development of new treatments, and wider ranges of populations affected, the management of chronic HIV infection continues to be- come more complex and demanding. Achievement of food and nutrition secu- rity and management of nutrition-re- lated complications of HIV infection re- main significant challenges for clients with HIV infection and health care pro- fessionals. Registered dietitians and die- tetic technicians, registered, should inte- grate their efforts into the overall health care strategies to optimize their clinical and social influence for people living with HIV infection. J Am Diet Assoc. 2010;110: 1105-1119. POSITION STATEMENT It is the position of the American Die- tetic Association that efforts to opti- mize nutritional status through indi- vidualized medical nutrition therapy, assurance of food and nutrition secu- rity, and nutrition education are es- sential to the total system of health care available to people with human immunodeficiency virus infection throughout the continuum of care. H uman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is part of social, political, and economic struggles worldwide. These issues present sig- nificant challenges to health care sys- tems in both the prevention and treatment of HIV infection ( 1 ). Ac- cording to the 2008 Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic ( 2 ), the preva- lence of HIV appears to have leveled off at ± 1% of the global population. New annual infections have declined from 3 million in 2001 to 2.7 million in 2007. By the end of 2007, an esti- mated 33 million people were living with HIV infection, including 2 mil- lion children younger than age 15 years and more than 15 million women. Other trends include the in- creased percentage of new infections in women, declining numbers of ver- tical infections from mother to child, and declining death rates. Overall, the number of people living with HIV has continued to grow, which can be largely attributed to population ex- pansion and the life-prolonging effects of antiretroviral therapies (ARTs).
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This note was uploaded on 11/21/2010 for the course NUT 116A 72876 taught by Professor Steinberg/stern during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

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JADA%202010PP_NutritionInterventionHIV - from the...

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