Wed%209_29%20Stern%20obesity

Wed%209_29%20Stern%20obesity - Obesity: A Modern Epidemic...

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1 Obesity: A Modern Epidemic Fall 2010 Nut 116 a Sept 29, 31 & October 1 CONFLICT OF INTEREST Weight Watchers Nutrition Advisory Board M&M Mars Nutrition Advisory Board Professor Stern Considers herself an expert Assignments Chapter 12. Energy Balance and Body Weight BUT - Not balanced 27 pages obesity vs total of 841 pages) Assume you understand basic nutrition, physiology, biochemistry You are encouraged to talk with TAs and me during office hours
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2 Obesity: A Modern Epidemic Is obesity a disease? Defining Obesity/Overweight Understanding the Problem Making Changes Managing The Problem Adults Children Sounding the Alarm Outline Is obesity a disease? Definition and classification of overweight/obesity Adults Children Body fat distribution Epidemiology HealthInsurance Coverage Co-morbidities Treatments Stigma and Social Discrimination Understanding The Problem Obesity is multi-factorial Some contributors to obesity Energy Balance Genetics Behavior Environment
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3 Energy Balance Change in body fat = difference between intake and expenditure (1 lb fat = 3500 kcalories) Obesity results from either increased intake of energy or decreased expenditure of energy This simple equation does not factor in variables that influence energy expenditure Physical Activity Overweight/obese people are often but not always less active than normal/underweight people Genetics Example Jeffrey Friedman of Rockefeller University holds a vial of the protein leptin. The protein reduced the body weight of mice by as much as 30 percent December 1994
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4 Leptin Receptor Defect Obese rat - close up Behavior Example Choice of food and amount eaten
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5 Environment Example Food advertising Is Obesity A Disease? What is the definition of a disease? Stedman’s Medical Dictionary (2 out of 3) Recognizable etiologic agents Identifiable signs and symptoms Consistent anatomical alterations What is a Disease? 1. Recognizable etiologic agent Genetic factors, Physiologic, Metabolic, Social, behavioral, cultural 2. Identifiable signs and symptoms Excess fat/adipose tissue, increase in size or number of fat cells, insulin resistance, increased glucose levels, increased blood pressure, elevated cholesterol and triglyceride levels, decreassd HDL, decreased norepinephrine and alterations in activity of sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system 3. Consistent anatomical alterations Increased body mass
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6 Examples of who considers obesity a disease
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This note was uploaded on 11/21/2010 for the course NUT 116A 72876 taught by Professor Steinberg/stern during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

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Wed%209_29%20Stern%20obesity - Obesity: A Modern Epidemic...

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