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Unformatted text preview: Crash Course Video Questions The 1960s in America: Crash Course US History #40 Directions: Watch the following Crash Course Video on Capitalism and Socialism and answer the following questions. Click on the Crash Course to watch the video. 1. Why were the ‘60s an “important time”? The ‘60s were an “important time” because there was the Cold War, Vietnam, a rising tide of conservatism (despite Woodstock), racism. Also there were the Kennedys and Camelot; John, Paul, George and, to a lesser extent, Ringo; and of course, there was also Martin Luther King Jr. 2. What did the 1960s “see”, what did this include, AND what overshadowed all others? The 1960s saw people organizing and actively working for change, both in the social order and in government. This included the student movement, the women's movement, movements for gay rights, and a push by the courts to expand rights in general. But by the end of the 1960s, the anti-war movement seemed to have overshadowed all the rest. 3. What actions were taken in the Civil Rights Movement in 1960 and 61 AND how were they successes? In 1960 some actions that were taken in the Civil Rights Movement were sit-ins, that took place in Greensboro, North Carolina. Black university students walked into Woolworth's and waited at the lunch counters to be served, or more likely, arrested. After five months of that, those students eventually got Woolworth's to serve black customers. Then, in 1961, leaders from the Congress of Racial Equality launched "Freedom Rides" to integrate interstate buses. Volunteers rode the buses into the deep South, where they faced violence, including beatings and a bombing in Anniston, Alabama. But despite that, those freedom rides also proved successful, and eventually, the ICC desegregated interstate buses. 4. What role did TV play in the Civil Rights Movement AND what was gained in the Birmingham protest? So the civil rights movement reached its greatest national prominence in 1963, when Martin Luther King came to Birmingham, Alabama, where there had been more than 50 racially motivated bombings since World War II. Television brought the reality of the Jim Crow South into people's homes, as images of Bull Connor's police dogs and water cannons being turned on peaceful marchers, many of them children, horrified viewers, and eventually led Kennedy to endorse the movement's goals. 5. What was MLK seeking in his March on Washington AND what was the result? 1963 also saw the March on Washington, the largest public demonstration in American history (up to that time), where King gave his famous speech, "I Have a Dream". King, and the other organizers, called for a civil rights bill and help for the poor, demanding public works, a higher minimum wage, and an end to discrimination in employment. Which eventually, in one of the great bright spots in American history, did sort of happen, with the Civil Rights Act. 6. What was LBJ’s “Great Society” AND summarize Foner’s take on the Great Society? Lyndon Johnson's domestic initiatives from 1965 through 1967 are known as the Great Society, and it's possible that if he hasn't been responsible for America escalating the war in Vietnam, he might have been remembered, at least by liberals, as one of America's greatest presidents. Because the Great Society expended a lot of the promises of the New Deal, especially in the creation of health insurance programs, like Medicare for the elderly, and Medicaid for the poor. He also went to war on poverty. Foner’s take on the Great Society was "By the 1990s, the historic gap between whites and blacks in education, income, and access to skilled employment narrowed considerably. But with deindustrialization and urban decay affecting numerous families and most suburbs still being off limits to non-white people, the median wealth of white households remained ten times greater than that of African Americans, and nearly a quarter of all black children lived in poverty." 7. What were signs of the growing frustration of African Americans with the goal of integration? Due to the persistent poverty and continued discrimination in the workplace, housing, education, and criminal justice system, it explains the shift away from integration and towards black power, a celebration of African American culture and criticism of white suppression. 1964 saw the beginnings of riots in city ghettos, for instance, mostly in northern cities. The worst riots were in 1965 in Watts, in southern California. These left 35 people dead, 900 injured, and $30 million in damage. Newark and Detroit also saw devastating riots in 1967. In 1968, the Kerner report blamed the cause of the rioting on segregation, poverty, and white racism. 8. What effects did the anti-war & civil rights movements have on Latinos, Native Americans, and gays? The anti-war movement and the civil rights movement inspired other groups to seek an end to oppression. Like Latinos organized to celebrate their heritage and end discrimination. Latino activism was like black power, but much more explicitly linked to labor justice, especially the strike efforts led by Cesar Chavez and the united farm workers. The American Indian movement, founded in 1968, took over Alcatraz, to symbolize the land that had been taken from Native Americans, and they won greater tribal control over education, economic development, and they also filed suits for restitution. And in June of 1969, after police raided a gay bar called the Stonewall Inn, members of the gay community began a series of demonstrations in New York City which touched off the modern gay liberation movement. 9. What is the significance of Silent Spring, the Mystery document AND what were the effects of this book? Silent Spring was a massively important book because it was the first time that anyone really described all of the astonishingly poisonous things we were putting into the air and the ground and the water. Fortunately that's all been straightened out, and everything that we do and make as human beings is now sustainable. The environmental movement gained huge bipartisan support, and it resulted in important legislation during the Nixon era, including the Clear Air and Water Acts, and the Endangered Species Act. And yes, I said that environmental legislation was passed during the Nixon administration. 10. How AND why did women organize? Friedan described a constricting social and economic system that affected mostly middle class women, but it resonated with the educated classes and led to the foundation of The National Organization of Women in 1966. Participation in the student and civil rights movement led many women to identify themselves as members of a group that was systematically discriminated against. And by systemic, I mean that in 1963, 5.8% of doctors were women, and 3.7% of lawyers were women, and fewer than 10% of doctoral degrees went to women. They are more than half of the population. 11. Explain how Supreme Court decisions “greatly expanded the protections of people accused of crimes”. And, although this would become a lightning rod for many conservatives, Supreme Court decisions greatly expanded the protections of people accused of crimes. Gideon v. Wainwright secured the right to an attorney, Mapp v. Ohio established the exclusionary rule under the Fourth Amendment, and Miranda v. Arizona provided fodder for Channing Tatum in his great movie 21 Jump Street, ensuring that he would always have to say to every perp, "You have the right to remain silent." But you can't silence my heart, Channing Tatum. It beats only for thee. But the most innovative and controversial decisions actually established a new right where none had existed in the constitution. Griswold v. Connecticut dealt with contraception, and Roe v. Wade guaranteed a woman's right to an abortion, at least in the first trimester, and those two decisions formed the basis of a new right: the right to privacy. Protests, the counterculture, and the liberation movements continued well into the 1970s, losing steam with the end of the Vietnam war and America's economy plunging into the toilet. For many though, the year 1968 sums up the decade. ...
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