4_Ch_6_Results_from_Kinetic_Theory_of_Gases

4_Ch_6_Results_from_Kinetic_Theory_of_Gases - MOLECULAR...

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Unformatted text preview: MOLECULAR MODEL FOR THE PRESSURE OF AN IDEAL GAS 1. The number of molecules is large, and the average separation between them is large compared with size. Therefore, the molecules occupy a negligible volume compared with the volume of the container and are considered point masses. 2. The molecules obey Newton's laws of motion, but the individual molecules move in a random fashion. By random fashion, we mean that the molecules move in all directions with equal probability and with various speeds. 3. The molecules undergo elastic collisions with each other, that is, the kinetic energy and momentum are conserved. 4. The forces between molecules are negligible except during a collision. 5. The gas is in thermal equilibrium with the walls of the container. Hence, a wall will eject as many molecules as it absorbs, and the ejected molecules will have the same average kinetic energy as the absorbed molecules. INTRODUCTION TO THE PRESSURE OF AN IDEAL GAS P is proportional to the number of collisions which is proportional to the concentration = N/V where N = number of molecules and V = volume. WHAT IS THE RELATION BETWEEN K.E. AND T FOR A GAS? WHAT IS THE RELATION BETWEEN K....
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2010 for the course R 102 taught by Professor Morrison during the Spring '10 term at Rutgers.

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4_Ch_6_Results_from_Kinetic_Theory_of_Gases - MOLECULAR...

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