Titration of amino acids

Titration of amino acids - Titrationcurves...

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Titration curves Of amino acids and weak  acids(acetic acid)
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Titration Titration curves are produced by  monitoring the pH of given volume of a  sample solution after successive addition  of acid or alkali The curves are usually plots of pH against  the volume of titrant added or more  correctly against the number of  equivalents added per mole of the sample
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Titration of acetic acid At the starting point the acid form  predominates (CH3COOH). As strong base is added (e.g. NaOH), the  acid is converted to its conjugate base. At the mid point of the titration, where  pH=pK, the concentrations of the acid and  the conjugate base are equal. At the end point(equivalence point), the  conjugate base  predominates, and the total  amount of OH added is equivalent to the  amount of acid that was present in the  starting point. 
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Titration
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Titration Determination of pKa values: pKa values can be obtained from the  titration data by the following methods: 1.The pH at the point of inflection is the pKa  value and this may be read directly 2.By definition the pKa value is equal to the  pH at which the acid is half titrated. The  pKa can therefore be obtained from the  knowledge of the end point of the titration.
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Titration of amino acids Titration of glycine Titration of arginine
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Titration When an amino acid is dissolved in water  it exists predominantly in the isoelectric  form. Upon titration with acid, it acts as a base, 
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2010 for the course BIO 360 taught by Professor Fink during the Spring '10 term at UCLA.

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Titration of amino acids - Titrationcurves...

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