The Greeks and Fallacy

The Greeks and Fallacy - The Greeks and Fallacy The Greeks...

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The Greeks and Fallacy The Greeks used fallacy as a way of persuasion of an argument. Fallacies are statements that might sound reasonable or superficially true but are actually fraudulent and dishonest. When a reader is aware of these logical fallacies, they can quickly detect it no matter what type of material they are reading. It is important to avoid fallacies in your own arguments, and to also be able to spot them in someone else’s arguments so a false line of reasoning won’t fool you. Knowing about the various types of fallacies, and when you hear them will be like self-defense in a debate. The Greek spoke a little different than the English. I will give you the names of the different types of fallacies and how they were pronounced and what they meant. Fallacies of Relevance, ( Argumentum Ad Balculm or the “Might Makes Right” Fallacy): This argument uses the threat of force to accept a conclusion. physical threats, such as I’ll break your legs if you don’t agree with me. Maybe even professionally, for example, Account Controller, you should find a way to cut the budget in the finance department at least by $8,000. Should I remind you that past Controllers have been fired for not keeping cost down in this department. Another example of relevance is, (
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The Greeks and Fallacy - The Greeks and Fallacy The Greeks...

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