Stress in America Report by APA

Stress in America Report by APA - October 24, 2007 Stress...

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October 24, 2007 Stress in America Table of Contents P. 2 Introduction P. 2 Methodology P. 3 Key Findings P. 3 Attitudes toward Stress P. 4 Psychological and Physical Impacts of Stress P. 6 Sources of Stress P. 7 Stress and Relationships P. 9 Stress Management P. 11 Snapshots of Stress in America P. 11 Stress in the Workplace P. 12 Gender and Stress P. 13 Marital Status and Stress P. 14 Income and Stress P. 15 Profession and Stress P. 16 Age and Stress P. 18 Stress by Region P. 19 Parenting and Stress
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Introduction Stress in America In September 2007, the American Psychological Association commissioned its annual nationwide survey to examine the state of stress across the country. The research measured attitudes and perceptions of stress among the general public, identifying leading sources of stress, common behaviors used to manage stress and the impact of stress on our lives. The survey explored: appropriate and excessive stress levels; circumstances, situations and life events that cause stress; activities, resources and behaviors people use to deal with stress; and the personal costs of stress. Methodology This survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Interactive on behalf of the American Psychological Association between August 30 and September 11, 2007, among 1,848 adults (aged 18 and over). Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish. Figures for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, region and household income were weighted where necessary to bring them in line with their actual proportions in the population. Hispanic respondents were also weighted based on language usage. Propensity score weighting was also used to adjust for respondents’ propensity to be online. With a pure probability sample of 1,848 one could say with a 95 percent probability that the overall results would have a sampling error of +/- 2 percentage points. Sampling error for data based on sub- samples would be higher and would vary. However, that does not take other sources of error into account. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no theoretical sampling error can be calculated. 2
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Key Findings STRESS: Portrait of a National Pressure Cooker Stress is a fact of life (agreed 79 percent of people), but according to survey responses, Americans routinely experience what they believe are higher than healthy levels of stress. One-third of people in the U.S. regularly report experiencing extreme levels of stress (32 percent), and nearly one in five (17 percent) report that they experienced their highest level of stress 15 or more days per month. Even more alarming, nearly half of Americans (48 percent) believe that their stress has increased over the past five years. While many Americans recognize that excessive levels of stress can have an impact on physical health (73
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2010 for the course BUSI 504 taught by Professor Nunn during the Summer '09 term at Columbia College.

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Stress in America Report by APA - October 24, 2007 Stress...

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