DSD chapter 1

DSD chapter 1 - ECSE 323 Digital System Design Boolean...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ECSE 323 Digital System Design Boolean Logic Theory Katarzyna Radecka katarzyna .radecka@mcgill.ca
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Acknowledgements Material used in this set of slides was based on Fundamentals of Digital Logic with VHDL Design ” by S. Brown and Z. Vranesic
Background image of page 2
How Did We Reach This Point? First generation ( vacuum tubes ), 1946-1958 Features huge, slow, expensive, and undependable Examples: ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer), 1946 EDVAC (Electronic Discrete Variable Automatic Computer), 1947 UNIVAC I (UNIVersal Automatic Computer), 1951 Second generation ( transistor ), 1959-1964 In 1947, John Bardeen, William Shockley, and Walter Brattain working at AT&T's Bell Labs invented transistor Conduct electricity faster and better than vacuum tubes Much smaller with virtually no heat dissipation compared to vacuum tubes Third generation ( integrated circuit ), 1965-1970 Robert Noyce of Fairchild Corporation and Jack Kilby of Texas Instruments independently discovered integrated circuits Fourth generation ( LSI/VLSI, Microprocessor ), 1971-present By putting millions of transistors onto one single chip more calculation and faster speeds could be reached by computers.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A Bit of History - Mechanical Computers Initially everything was hardware First machines performed computations using “electromechanically” elements Example: First Computer - Difference Engine (1822) - mechanical special-purpose computer designed to calculate polynomials using numerical difference method Number of parts used - 25,000 Cost - 17,470 pounds
Background image of page 4
A Bit of History - First Electronic Devices In early 1900 still no commercially available electronic products! First diode vacuum tubes invented in 1906 Two-terminal devices with two active electrodes Initially referred to as rectifiers , named diode by Eccles from Greek words; di - two, and ode (odos) - paths Next step - triodes (1908), i.e., precursors of transistors Considered the be first electric amplifiers Dddition of third element “net” to diode enabling amplification of signal with good isolation from I/Os Complex electronic devices implemented using vacuum tubes included TV sets and compters
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Evolution of Computers ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer), 1946, UPenn Courtesy of the Computer History Museum. Fine-tuning ENIAC. J. Presper Eckert (the man in the foreground turning a knob) served and John Mauchly (center) designed ENIAC to calculate the trajectory of artillery shells. The machine didn't debut until February 1946, after the end of World War II, but it did launch the computer revolution. Facts: 5000 simple adds/subs per second Power: 150KW Weight: 30 tons Size: 1800 sq. ft (167 m 2 ) Contained 17,468 vacuum tubes, 7,200 crystal diodes, 1,500 relays, 70,000 resistors, 10,000 capacitors and around 5 million hand-soldered joints.
Background image of page 6
ENIAC Vacuum Tubes Vacuum tubes act like an amplifier and a switch . Without any moving parts, vacuum tubes could take very weak signals and make the signal stronger ( amplify it ). Vacuum tubes could also stop and start the flow of electricity instantly ( switch ). These two properties made the ENIAC computer possible.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/22/2010 for the course ECSE ecse 323 taught by Professor Redacka during the Winter '07 term at McGill.

Page1 / 81

DSD chapter 1 - ECSE 323 Digital System Design Boolean...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online