4 - psychopharmacology

4 - psychopharmacology - 03:30 Psychopharmacology The study...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
03:30 Psychopharmacology: The study of the effects of drugs on the nervous system  and on behavior Drug: An exogenous chemical not necessary for normal cellular functioning that  significantly alters the functions of certain cells of the body when taken in  relatively low doses Drug effects: The changes we can observe in an animal’s physiological  processes and behavior  Sites of action: The points at which molecules of drugs interact with molecules  located on or in cells of the body, thus affecting some biochemical processes  of these cells 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Principles of Psychopharmacology 03:30 Pharmacokinetics The process by which drugs are absorbed, distributed within the body,  metabolized, and excreted Routes of Administration o For laboratory animals, the most common route is injection  Intravenous (IV) injection: Injection into a vein  The drug enters the bloodstream immediately and reaches the  brain within a few seconds  o Intraperitoneal (IP) injection: Rapid but not as rapid as an IV injection The drug is injected through the abdominal wall into the peritoneal  cavity  Intramuscular (IM) injection: Made directly into a large muscle The drug is absorbed into the bloodstream through the capillaries  that supply the muscle  Subcutaneous (SC) injection: Injected into the space beneath the skin  Useful only if small amounts of drug need to be administered  o Oral administration: The most common form of administering medicinal  drugs to humans Sublingual administration: Placing them beneath the tongue The drug is absorbed into the bloodstream by the capillaries that  supply the mucous membrane that lines the mouth  o Intrarectal administration: Rarely used to give drugs to experimental  animals Rectal suppositories are most commonly used to administer drugs that  might upset a person’s stomach o Inhalation The route from the lungs to the brain is very short, and drugs  administered this way have very rapid effects o Topical administration: Absorbed directly through the skin o Intracerebral administration: A very small amount of a drug is injected  directly into the brain
Background image of page 2
Principles of Psychopharmacology 03:30 Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration: A researcher gets past the  blood-brain barrier by injecting the drug into a cerebral ventricle The drug is then absorbed by brain tissue Distribution of Drugs Within the Body o Drugs exert their effects only when they reach their sites of action  All the sites of action of drugs of interest to psychopharmacologists lie  outside the blood vessels o Several factors determine the rate at which a drug in the bloodstream 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 15

4 - psychopharmacology - 03:30 Psychopharmacology The study...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online