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lecture03 - Astronomy Picture of the Day The"Tadpole galaxy...

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Astronomy Picture of the Day The “Tadpole” galaxy, seen by the Hubble Space Telescope
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Announcements Discussion sections start this friday Only go to the section that you’re registered for- the sections are totally full and this is the only way to ensure that everyone will get a seat Homework is due in the drop box on the 4th floor of Reines Hall by 8:45am on friday
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The full electromagnetic spectrum 10 -12 10 -11 10 -10 10 -9 10 -8 10 -7 10 -6 10 -5 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 3 Wavelength (meters) Visible Light Infrared Microwave Radio Ultraviolet X-ray Gamma-ray TV FM AM
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Photons Light has both wave and particle properties Electromagnetic radiation comes in discrete, particle-like packets, called photons White light (like sunlight, or light from an incandescent light bulb) contains a mixture of photons of different wavelengths
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Photons Light has both wave and particle properties Electromagnetic radiation comes in discrete, particle-like packets, called photons White light (like sunlight, or light from an incandescent light bulb) contains a mixture of photons of different wavelengths
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Photons Light has both wave and particle properties Electromagnetic radiation comes in discrete, particle-like packets, called photons White light (like sunlight, or light from an incandescent light bulb) contains a mixture of photons of different wavelengths
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Photons and Energy A photon has no mass, but carries energy The energy of a photon is proportional to its frequency: E = h ν where h = Planck’s Constant h = 6.63 × 10 -34 J · sec The energy of a single visible photon is tiny! A 100 W light bulb emits more than 10 20 photons each second!
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10 -12 10 -11 10 -10 10 -9 10 -8 10 -7 10 -6 10 -5 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 3 Wavelength (meters) Visible Light Infrared Microwave Radio Ultraviolet X-ray Gamma-ray TV FM AM Smaller Wavelength Larger Higher Frequency Lower Higher Photon Energy Lower
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Wavelength Energy V I B G Y O R The Spectrum of Light We can describe an object’s spectrum with a plot of the amount of energy emitted as a function of wavelength, like this: A continuous spectrum includes light over a broad range of wavelengths
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Colors of Spectra A redder spectrum is one that peaks at longer wavelengths A bluer spectrum is one that peaks at shorter wavelengths Bluer spectrum Redder spectrum V I B G Y O R Wavelength Energy
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Black-body Radiation
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