Lecture15 - Astronomy Picture of the Day Another view of Comet Hartley The Terrestrial Planets Venus's surface Mapped out with radar by the

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Astronomy Picture of the Day Another view of Comet Hartley
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The Terrestrial Planets
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Venus’s surface Mapped out with radar by the Magellan mission (1989-1994) Many large volcanic mountains, but none currently active Only about 1000 impact craters found Older craters may have been “erased” by a major planet- wide volcanic event about 500 million years ago
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Impact craters
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Impact craters
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Volcanoes
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Venus’s Surface
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Venus’s Surface
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Soviet Venera Missions USSR sent several probes and landers to Venus in the 1970s and early 1980s Landers were able to survive for 20 minutes to 2 hours, and study the atmosphere and soil
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Venus Express European mission, launched 2005, in orbit around Venus since April 2006 Designed to study Venus’s atmosphere and climate, greenhouse effect, surface features and volcanic history
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Transits of Venus They only occur rarely because the orbital planes of Earth and Venus aren’t perfectly aligned Transits occur in pairs: 1874/1882, 2004/2012, etc. Transits in 1639, 1761, 1769 were important for determining the distance to Venus and the value of the A.U. The 2004 transit
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Mars
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Mars’s moons Deimos Mean radius 6.2 km Orbital semimajor axis 23,460 km Phobos Mean radius: 11 km Orbital semimajor axis 9377 km
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Mars’s atmosphere Mostly carbon dioxide (95.3%)
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2010 for the course PHYSICS PHYSICS 20 taught by Professor Aaronbarth during the Winter '10 term at UC Irvine.

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Lecture15 - Astronomy Picture of the Day Another view of Comet Hartley The Terrestrial Planets Venus's surface Mapped out with radar by the

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