lecture20 - Astronomy Picture of the Day The Iris Nebula...

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Astronomy Picture of the Day The Iris Nebula
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Announcements Observatory viewing night: next tuesday, Nov. 16, 7-9 pm I’ll give out directions on monday 2010 Leonid meteor shower peaks next wednesday night after midnight Quiz next friday in discussion section: bring a scantron form and pencil
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Other Planetary Systems Terminology: an “exoplanet” or “extrasolar planet” is a planet orbiting another star
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Other planetary systems Why is it so hard to fnd planets around other stars? They are faint : they shine only in reFected light They are close to their parent stars It’s very hard to detect tiny, very ±aint things that are right next to bright things!
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Orbital Motion The center of mass is the average location of all the mass in the system. It remains stationary as the star and planet revolve around it. Because of Jupiter’s orbital motion, the Sun wobbles around the center of mass of the Sun-Jupiter system at a speed of 12 meters/sec. The Sun Jupiter Note- this diagram is not drawn to scale!
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How to fnd other planetary systems RedshiFted spectrum From this side oF the star’s orbit BlueshiFted spectrum From this side oF the star’s orbit The planet is too Faint to be visible!
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The doppler technique The “wobble” velocity that’s observed depends on the
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2010 for the course PHYSICS PHYSICS 20 taught by Professor Aaronbarth during the Winter '10 term at UC Irvine.

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lecture20 - Astronomy Picture of the Day The Iris Nebula...

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