1hMANPVPTPngas - P-T, P-V, & P-n Relationships in Gases...

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P-T, P-V, & P-n Relationships in Gases Revised 1/22/10 1 PRESSURE-TEMPERATURE, PRESSURE-VOLUME, & PRESSURE- MOLES RELATIONSHIP IN GASES Adapted from "Chemistry with Computers" Vernier Software, Portland OR, 1997 OBJECTIVES The mathematical relationships between gas pressure and temperature; gas pressure and volume; and gas pressure and moles will be determined and then the value for absolute zero in Celsius temperature will be found graphically. SAFETY Students must wear safety goggles and lab aprons at all times in the lab. Be careful when handling heated glassware. Use paper towels, toweling, or tongs to avoid burns. INTRODUCTION Molecules in the gas phase are in constant motion. Gas pressure is a measurement of the number of collisions of molecules with the walls of the container. The velocity and the number of collisions of these molecules changes when the temperature of the gas increases or decreases. In this experiment, the relationship between the temperature of a gas sample and the pressure it exerts will be investigated. Using the apparatus shown in Figure 1, an Erlenmeyer flask containing an air sample will be placed in water baths of varying temperature. Pressure will be monitored with a pressure sensor and temperature will be monitored using a temperature probe. The volume of the gas sample and the number of molecules it contains must be kept constant. Pressure and temperature data pairs will be collected during the experiment and then analyzed. From the data and graph, you will determine what kind of mathematical relationship exists between the pressure and absolute
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P-T, P-V, & P-n Relationships in Gases Revised 1/22/10 2 temperature of a confined gas. Based on these data, the value for absolute zero on the Celsius temperature scale will be determined. Figure 1 The relationship between the pressure and volume of the confined gas was first established by Robert Boyle in 1662 and has since been known as Boyle’s law. The second part of the experiment is to determine the relationship between the pressure and volume of a confined gas. The gas will again be air, and it will be confined in a syringe connected to a Gas Pressure Sensor (see Figure 2). When the volume of the syringe is changed by moving the piston, a change occurs in the pressure exerted by the confined gas. This pressure change will be monitored using a Gas Pressure Sensor. The temperature will be assumed constant throughout the experiment. Pressure and volume data pairs will be collected during this experiment and then analyzed. Figure 2 . The third part of the experiment is to determine the relationship between pressure and moles of gas. One mole of air occupies 22.4 liters at standard temperature and pressure (0 ˚ C and 1 atm). It is known that one mole of air is composed of 0.7808 moles of nitrogen, 0.2095 moles of
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2010 for the course CHEMISTRY Chem 1LB taught by Professor Dr.kimberlyedwards during the Fall '10 term at UC Irvine.

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1hMANPVPTPngas - P-T, P-V, & P-n Relationships in Gases...

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