RDGSAMs - RDG: Aerosols and Ozone Revised: 12/04/08...

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RDG: Aerosols and Ozone Revised: 12/04/08 1 AEROSOLS AND OZONE Organic Aerosols in the Atmosphere Airborne particles are important for visibility, human health, climate, and atmospheric reactions. Atmospheric particles contain a significant fraction of organics and such compounds present on airborne particles or aerosols are susceptible to oxidation by atmospheric oxidants, such as OH, ozone, halogen atoms, and nitrogen trioxide. Aerosols are small (sub-micron to several microns) particles in suspension in the atmosphere that can be in the solid or liquid phase. Organic aerosols are widespread in the atmosphere and frequently comprise a significant fraction of the total aerosol number concentration and mass (mainly in the fine mode) and are poorly identified. Aerosols originate both from natural (biogenic) and man-made (anthropogenic) sources. 1,2 Primary aerosols are directly emitted into the atmosphere by volcanoes, transport of dust particles, from combustion during biomass burning, from wave action that creates sea spray, from emission by vegetation, etc. (see Figure 2 below) Aerosols can also be the result of chemical reactions (gas-to-particle conversion or secondary aerosols). It is estimated that 10% to 20% of the aerosols can be characterized as anthropogenic on the global
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RDGSAMs - RDG: Aerosols and Ozone Revised: 12/04/08...

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