Lecture01_10 - Physics19 GreatIdeasofPhysics Lecture1...

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Physics 19 Great Ideas of Physics Lecture 1: It’s All Greek to Me!
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Course Goals To introduce seven of the most fundamental  ideas of Physics to non-scientists Like an Art History or Music Appreciation course  for scientists, but the other way around At the end you should be able to explain  these ideas and their origins understandably “You don’t really understand something unless  you can explain it to your grandmother.” - Einstein
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Who Cares About Physics? A part of our intellectual and cultural heritage Shakespeare, Mozart, Monet, Newton – all creators Science helps shape our attitude toward the world Our understanding of it makes modern life possible Physics is all around us in the things we take for granted Essential to our well-being Critical, analytical thinking is not unique to science Applicable to many different fields: arts, humanities,  social sciences, business, etc. Aerobics for your brain!
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Seven Ideas The Earth is not the Center of the Universe The world runs like a mechanism, with  definite rules Energy drives the mechanism The mechanism runs in a specific direction Facts are relative, but the laws are absolute You can’t predict or know everything Fundamentally, things never change
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Three Themes We’ll explore the “great ideas” of Physics  from three different angles: Historical: Who, Where, When? Physical: What? Philosophical: How? Why?
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The Historical Theme Who…? Where…? When…? Development of our understanding of the world,  from the ancient Greeks to the present day Place key discoveries in the context of their times How were they the product of their times? How did they influence them? Meet some interesting characters: Aristotle, Galileo, Newton, Einstein, … Physicists are people too!
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The Physical Theme What…? Look at the physical laws – seven “Great Ideas”: The Earth is not the center of the universe The world runs like a mechanism, according to well- established rules Energy is what drives the mechanism The mechanism runs in a particular direction Facts  are relative but the laws  are absolute We can’t know or predict everything Fundamentally, some things never change
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The Philosophical Theme How…? Why…? How has Physics (and science in general)  succeeded in learning about nature? What are laws, theories, models and facts? What are the limits to what we can know? How do scientists think and look at the world?
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Lecture01_10 - Physics19 GreatIdeasofPhysics Lecture1...

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