Lecture08_10 - Physics19 GreatIdeasofPhysics Lecture8...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Physics 19: Great Ideas of Physics Lecture 8: Heat Flow, Gases and the Atomic Theory
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Summary When the definition of energy is expanded to  include heat, energy is conserved in all mechanical  and chemical processes The First Law of Thermodynamics Heat and Temperature are different Heat is energy flow Temperature tells us which direction heat will flow Power is a rate of change or transfer of energy  over time
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Click to edit Master subtitle style Heat Flow and Engines
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The Flow of Heat If two things with different  temperatures are placed in  contact, heat always flows  from the hotter to the  colder Never the other way around! The rate of heat flow is  proportional to the  difference  in temperature Newton first measured this Hot coffee Cooler air Heat flow
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Thermal Equilibrium If two isolated bodies are in thermal contact  (able to exchange heat), they will eventually  reach the same temperature Thermal equilibrium Once at the same temperature, no heat will  be exchanged between them This is the  definition  of being at the same  temperature!
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Irreversibility Newton’s Laws are completely reversible A movie of balls bouncing around a billiard table  obeys them, whether we watch it forward or  backward The flow of heat is an  irreversible  process: If we make a movie of something cooling, or two  objects coming to thermal equilibrium, and run  the movie backwards, what we see will never 
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Sadi Carnot (1796-1832) Son of a French revolutionary Father was a member of the  Directorate and an officer in  Napoleon’s army Attended military academy Later studied how steam  engines work Died in a cholera epidemic  when only 36 Importance of work was not 
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Carnot’s Engine Carnot modeled heat engines  by analogy to falling water 
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This note was uploaded on 11/26/2010 for the course PHYS Physics 19 taught by Professor Davidcasper during the Spring '10 term at UC Irvine.

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Lecture08_10 - Physics19 GreatIdeasofPhysics Lecture8...

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