Quantitative Information from Balanced Equations

Quantitative Information from Balanced Equations - 2 O...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Stoichiometry: Chemical Formulas and Equations Quantitative information from balanced equations Quantitative Information from Balanced Equations The coefficients in a balanced chemical equation can be interpreted both as the relative numbers of molecules involved in the reaction and as the relative number of moles . For example, in the balanced equation: 2H 2 ( g ) + O 2 ( g )-> 2H 2 O( l ) the production of two moles of water would require the consumption of 2 moles of H 2 and one mole of O 2 . Therefore, when considering this particular reaction 2 moles of H 2 1 mole of O 2 and 2 moles of H 2 O would be considered to be stoichiometrically equivalent quantitites . Represented as: 2 mol H 2 1 mol O 2 2 mol H 2 O Where ' ' means " stoichiometrically equivalent to ". These stoichiometric relationships, derived from balanced equations, can be used to determine expected amounts of products given amounts of reactants. For example, how many moles of H
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 2 O would be produced from 1.57 moles of O 2 (assuming the hydrogen gas is not a limiting reactant)? The ratio is the stoichiometric relationship between H 2 O and O 2 from the balanced equation for this reaction. For the combustion of butane (C 4 H 10 ) the balanced equation is: Calculate the mass of CO 2 that is produced in burning 1.00 gram of C 4 H 10 . First of all we need to calculate how many moles of butane we have in a 100 gram sample: now, the stoichiometric relationship between C 4 H 10 and CO 2 is: , therefore: The question called for the determination of the mass of CO 2 produced, thus we have to convert moles of CO 2 into grams (by using the molecular weight of CO 2 ): Thus, the overall sequence of steps to solve this problem were: In a similar way we could determine the mass of water produced, or oxygen consumed, etc. 1996 Michael Blaber...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/22/2010 for the course ENGINEERIN 104791 taught by Professor Puteri during the Spring '10 term at International Islamic University Malaysia.

Page1 / 2

Quantitative Information from Balanced Equations - 2 O...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online