Topic 11 - POLI 311: Empirical Methods Topic 11: Causal...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 11/24/10 POLI 311 | McGill University POLI 311: Empirical Methods Topic 11: Causal Thinking & Research Design
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11/24/10 Tune-up Q--If we want to generalize from a sample to the population, we have to use: 1. Bivariate statistics 2. Inferential statistics 3. Multivariate statistics 4. Descriptive statistics 5. None of the above
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11/24/10 Tune-up Q: Testing a hypothesis requires: 1. The use of statistics 2. Variation in the independent variable 3. A normally distributed sample 4. All of the above 5. None of the above
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Click to edit Master subtitle style 11/24/10 POLI 311 | McGill University Topic 11: Causal Thinking & Research Design Internal validity Overview The nature of causal inferences The classic experimental design Why is research design so important? Extrinsic & intrinsic threats to internal validity Variations on the classic experimental design
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Click to edit Master subtitle style 11/24/10 POLI 311 | McGill University Why is research design so important? Topic 11: Causal Thinking & Research Design Purpose: to impose controlled restrictions on our observations of the empirical world. Allows the researcher to draw causal inferences with confidence Defines the domain of generalizability of those inferences
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Click to edit Master subtitle style 11/24/10 POLI 311 | McGill University The Nature of Causal Inferences Topic 11: Causal Thinking & Research Design We can never be certain that one variable ‘causes’ another, but we can increase confidence in our causal inferences if we can: Eliminate sources of spuriousness Establish time order Demonstrate co-variation
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Click to edit Master subtitle style 11/24/10 POLI 311 | McGill University The Nature of Causal Inferences Topic 11: Causal Thinking & Research Design Spuriousness Rule out the possibility that the IV and DV only co-vary because they share a common cause Time Order Show that a change in the IV preceded a change in the DV Co-variation Show that the IV and DV vary together in a patterned, consistent way (if A, then B)
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Click to edit Master subtitle style 11/24/10 POLI 311 | McGill University The Classic Experimental Design Topic 11: Causal Thinking & Research Design A Control Group The classic experimental design consists of two groups: These two groups are equivalent in every respect, except that the experimental group is exposed to the IV and the control group is not An Experimental Group
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Click to edit Master subtitle style 11/24/10 POLI 311 | McGill University The Classic Experimental Design
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2010 for the course POLI POLI-311-0 taught by Professor Melaneethomas during the Fall '10 term at McGill.

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Topic 11 - POLI 311: Empirical Methods Topic 11: Causal...

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