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Workbooklet2010 - BCH 210H Enzyme and Metabolism Workbook...

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BCH 210H Enzyme and Metabolism Workbook Dr. R.R. Baker Department of Biochemistry University of Toronto
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Enzymes Introduction/Classification 1. To what class of enzyme does carbonic anhydrase belong? Can you explain this? 2. Carbonic anhydrase certainly acts very rapidly. Can you think of one reason for its considerable speed? 3. Hydrolases often catalyze very favourable reactions. For example: Pyrophosphate + H 2 O 2 inorganic phosphate However, hydolases are not favourable in the reverse direction: 2 inorganic phosphate pyrophosphate + H 2 O Can you explain why this is so?
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Enzyme Specificity 1. In the body, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) converts ethanol into acetaldehyde. Then acetaldehyde undergoes a further enzyme catalyzed oxidation. What would be the products of ADH if CH 3 -OH was the substrate? What is CH 3 -OH? 2. Can you explain the toxicity that develops if someone ingests CH 3 -OH? Can you name a common domestic source of CH 3 -OH? 3. You are given 1 millimole (10 -3 moles) of the peptide: MLLWKIKGGRTFPKGG. This is completely hydrolyzed in solution at pH 8 by the enzyme trypsin (which is active in the small intestine). a) What are the products of this protease, when the peptide is completely degraded by trypsin? How many moles of water are needed for this reaction? b) Why do you think that trypsin has an alkaline pH optimum (pH 8)?
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