TheLeadersNewWorkBuildingLearningOrganizations

TheLeadersNewWorkBuildingLearningOrganizations - MIT...

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The Leader’s New Work: Building Learning Organizations Peter M. Senge Reprint 3211 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Fall 1990 Volume 32 Number 1 MIT This document is authorized for use by Robert Fleishman , from 10/19/2010 to 1/19/2011, in the course: BADM 053: Management, Organizations & Society - Radin (Fall-2 2010), George Washington University. Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited.
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This document is authorized for use by Robert Fleishman , from 10/19/2010 to 1/19/2011, in the course: BADM 053: Management, Organizations & Society - Radin (Fall-2 2010), George Washington University. Any unauthorized use or reproduction of this document is strictly prohibited.
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Sloan Management Review 7 Fall 1990 H UMAN BEINGS are designed for learning. No one has to teach an infant to walk, or talk, or master the spatial relation- ships needed to stack eight building blocks that don’t topple. Children come fully equipped with an insatiable drive to explore and experiment. Unfortunately, the primary institutions of our society are oriented predominantly toward con- trolling rather than learning, rewarding individu- als for performing for others rather than for cul- tivating their natural curiosity and impulse to learn. The young child entering school discovers quickly that the name of the game is getting the right answer and avoiding mistakes — a man- date no less compelling to the aspiring manager. “Our prevailing system of management has destroyed our people,” writes W. Edwards Deming, leader in the quality movement. 1 “People are born with intrinsic motivation, self- esteem, dignity, curiosity to learn, joy in learn- ing. The forces of destruction begin with tod- dlers — a prize for the best Halloween costume, grades in school, gold stars, and on up through the university. On the job, people, teams, divi- sions are ranked — reward for the one at the top, punishment at the bottom. MBO quotas, incen- tive pay, business plans, put together separately, division by division, cause further loss, unknown and unknowable.” Ironically, by focusing on performing for someone else’s approval, corporations create the very conditions that predestine them to mediocre performance. Over the long run, superior perfor- mance depends on superior learning. A Shell study showed that, according to former planning director Arie de Geus, “a full one-third of the Fortune ‘500’ industrials listed in 1970 had van- ished by 1983 .” 2 Today, the average lifetime of the largest industrial enterprises is probably less than half the average lifetime of a person in an industrial society. On the other hand, de Geus and his colleagues at Shell also found a small number of companies that survived for seventy- five years or longer. Interestingly, the key to their survival was the ability to run “experiments in the margin,” to continually explore new business and organizational opportunities that create po- tential new sources of growth.
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course CHIN 3111 taught by Professor Chaves during the Spring '10 term at GWU.

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TheLeadersNewWorkBuildingLearningOrganizations - MIT...

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