StarbucksSucks!

StarbucksSucks! - Case A Starbucks Sucks Starbucks Coffee...

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1 Case A: Starbucks … Sucks? * Starbucks. Coffee. Yum. There is barely a person alive today in any major developed country who is not familiar with the name “Starbucks.” Even non-coffee-drinkers know Starbucks . Why? Because Starbucks took the world by storm—first Seattle, then the United States, then the world. People have been drinking coffee for centuries, but Starbucks turned it into a pastime. They introduced a few beans, provided a few seats in a café setting, created a simple logo, and…. Shazam! Starbucks. Seems simple. And it was. In Seattle, Starbucks was nothing particularly out-of-the ordinary—there were numerous similar establishments, and coffee drinking in a café setting had been common for years. But Starbucks moved beyond Seattle, and, in doing so, created a legend. Today, the greatest possible compliment has been paid to Starbucks in that it is being imitated in all possible ways. Similar establishments around the world have popped up with their own flavors of the same sorts of products that Starbucks sells. But there is only one Starbucks . STARBUCKS AND DOROSIN Jeremy Dorosin was a loyal Starbucks customer. He not only enjoyed Starbucks coffee, but he invested in a Starbucks-branded espresso machine as well. Dorosin remained a fan of Starbucks even after this espresso machine, a “Vapore,” turned out to be defective. He returned it to the location where he bought and Starbucks not only made sure it was repaired, but also provided him with a loaner for him to use free of charge while his machine was being serviced. During this time, in April 1995, Dorosin happened to stop by Starbucks to buy another espresso machine—this time as a gift. Although the original coffee maker that he bought for himself was still being repaired, he was so impressed with the loaner, an “Estro 410,” that he decided to buy one for a friend as a wedding present. The loaner cost only $169, as opposed to the one for which he had paid $289, but it seemed like a better machine. Dorosin was initially somewhat concerned about his purchase. The box in which the espresso machine was packaged was visibly worn. “The box was dog-eared,” Dorosin explained, “and the machine looked used, although the clerk assured me that packages from * © Copyright 2008 by Tara J. Radin.
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2 Europe often looked that way.” According to the salesperson, said Dorosin, “they just got roughed up a little in transit.” In light of the condition of the package, Dorosin was hesitant. When he was told it was the last model in stock, though, he decided to go ahead and make the purchase. At the checkout counter, Dorosin experienced additional dissatisfaction. When he requested the complimentary half-pound of coffee that the store ordinarily included with coffee- maker purchases, the cashier refused. “You get nothing,” said the cashier. According to Dorosin, “It was humiliating to be in the store surrounded by other
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course CHIN 3111 taught by Professor Chaves during the Spring '10 term at GWU.

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StarbucksSucks! - Case A Starbucks Sucks Starbucks Coffee...

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