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Monkey materials

Monkey materials - c324 attain r.v 7_‘i Y Entrance to the...

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Unformatted text preview: c324: attain r .v.__.' 7 _‘i Y Entrance to the temple In, It all starts with the medium praying before the statue of the Great Sage. And he goes on praying until — as he says ~ he feels the Monkey God take over his body. From then on, the Great Sage uses the medium’s body to prove his presence there and to demons- trate his supernatural powers. First the medium plunges both hands into a bowl of boiling oi]. He then climbs a tower as high as a IG-storey building -» going up a ladder with rungs of knives, sharp edges upwards. An assistant climbs up the metal framework of the tower and, when both men reach the top, they perform a series of religious ceremonies. After descending the ladder, the medium runs through a fire of burning coal and wood, about 20 yards tong. And finally he bites into a china rice bowl, uses one of the broken pieces to cut his tongue, and then licks the blood onto green slips of paper called fa which bear symbols to keep away evii spirits and bring good fortune. The papers are distributed among worshippers, who in return make a donation to the temple. Afterwards there are hours of festivities, with lion dancers and a procession through the streets, and the day finishes with a vegetarian feast. The same medium has performed the Monkey God feats for the past I0 years. He says that he is never conscious of what he’s doing, that he feels no pain, and that he suffers no injury. A group of impartial observers examined his hands and feet after one year’s performance and they could find no burns or cuts. ————-__—__——____— This kind of thing is far from rare in the East, but it seems particularly appropriate to the character of the Monkey God. He‘s said to have started life as a stone monkey — hatched from an egg on a mountainside. Somehow he became mobile and because _ of his human intelligence he was soon king of all the monkeys. He , _- then got big ideas about extending his kingdom and becoming an ' - immortal. and he persuaded one of the Taoist immortais to teach ; him at thing or two. Before long. Monkey was proficient at somer- ; saulting from one cloud to another—he could cover 36,000 miles, E or 108,000 l'i, in one somersault—and he was able to transform himself into scores of different forms. Using these abiiities, he built up his own empire at other people’s expense, and generaliy ran riot on earth. He continued to make such a nuisance of himself that he was kicked upstairs to heaven, where he was offered an appointment .' as Master of the Jade Emperor’s Stabies. Monkey considered this ' to be such an insuit that he upset the King of Heaven‘s throne and escaped back to earth again. He was then offered a grander position in heaven, supervising the Imperial Peach Gardens. This he accepted, but when he wasn‘t invited to the annual banquet where the gods gathered to eat the sacred peaches, he forestalleci the feast by eating all the fruit himself. He also ate the pills of immortality, so that when the death penaity was imposed for all his sins, the executioner was unable to carry out the sentence. Two subsidiary tempies include one to Kwun Yum, Goddess of Mercy Page 1 of 1 Su Shih 15/72: as many monkeys: ! a blac nd longwlived turned int - ' t priest, through mount ' 3 Pine roots entwined his feet; ’ vines tied knots around his arms. Green moss blinded his eyes, clustered t d and choked his mouth. After three years, he transformed into stone, hard and trim like gemstone or jade. hrough the clouds; t No longer could he cry out t c: all that remained — one hand to raise wine cups! A woodcutter found him, and laughing ' down to barter for rice. gh and ugly,' he asks m ; Its history I have clear e truthfulness n Never—Was! 23>. 1'}?- r! . 1 .‘M No. 152 Man’s life is but one hundred years; Buddha's teachings fall into twelve groups.1 I Fig. 33- Mutilation offifirpanakhe‘l, 5th C. A.D., Dcugnrt Compassion is like a Wild deer,2 But anger resembles the family dog? ‘$%@§% % asses $H+$$'%fll%> The family dog—though you chase it, it won't go away, Whereas the wild deer is always ready to flee. 4 If you want to conquer the heart 2f the monkey, You must listen to the lion's roar. 'fifififlfi 1. The Mahayana canon has twelve divisions (shill-er}: pu}. They are: (1) sfitra, (2) gays, (3) gatha', (4) m'ddna, (5) itt‘vrtmka, (6) jdmka, (7) abhidhamra, (8) mddm (9) upadesa, (IO) uddm, (11) wripulya, and (12) vytikamna. 2. Specifically the sika deer (In). Compassion (iz'u-per', karma) is one of the supreme Buddhist virtues. 3. And anger (here ch'en-fen) is one of the six Heats (delusions, defile— ments). The analogies between compassion and deer, and anger and dogs are drawn in the Nirvana-517m, Ch. 14 (”12375, Vol 12, p. 396 top). There we read: "The family dog is not afraid of people; the wild deer of mountain forests run away in fear when they see people. Anger is difficult to elimi- nate; it's like holding on to the family dog: the compassionate heart is eas- ily lost; it’s like those wild deer.” -fi§%§ \. d saaan $%E§ 4. Another allusion to the Nimdna-sfitra (Ch. 29, 1374, Vol. 12, p. 536 ' bottom), where the heart and nature of all living things is compared to that of the monkey. The text says: ”The heart and nature of sentient beings is like that of the monkey. The nature of the monkey is that he rejects one thing and holds on to another. The heart and nature of sentient beings is also like this. They hold on to and are attached to the dharmas of form, sound, smell, taste, and touch without any temporary stop.” 5. Shih-tzu hau (simhamida) stands for the powerful preaching of the Buddha, frightening and conquering non-believers, just as the lion’s roar frightens and intimidates the other animals of the jungle. Fig. 83. Search of Site, 5th C. A.D., Patna Museum ...
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