FMSC381budgetanalysispaper

FMSC381budgetanalysispaper - Amanda Fachler FMSC381 Poverty...

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Amanda Fachler FMSC381 Poverty Simulation Project Due: October 20 th , 2009 I pledge on my honor that I have not given or received any unauthorized assistance on this assignment. AF
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PART ONE When I was born, the socioeconomic status of my family was very different than it was when I was growing up. My parents had just moved to the suburbs of Long Island with my then two-year-old brother. They had moved from Brooklyn and it was their first actual house. Times were hard for my parents maintaining this new lifestyle, but by the time I turned about two, there was much more financial stability with my family. This led me to grow up in a childhood where my socioeconomic family background was upper class. When I was about eleven years old my father received a promotion to partner in his firm and we moved to high upper class. We also moved homes at this time and upgraded our living style a little bit. My brother and I were always taught to not take anything for granted, to appreciate the beautiful childhood our parents could provide for us, and to give back at any chance we received throughout our lives. These values and lessons were without a doubt attributed to my father’s very poor upbringing in Brooklyn, New York, and my mother’s lower class upbringing in Queens, New York. Both of my parents grew up with very little means, my mother more so than my father as she resided in a one-bedroom apartment with her mentally ill mother and older sister after her father abandoned them. My father grew up in the projects of Brooklyn and maintained the knowledge throughout his life of what it was like to have almost nothing. Despite their hardships, both of my parents went on to seek education, paying for it entirely by themselves, and now are both highly successful in their fields. Because of this upbringing of theirs, my brother and I were always taught to give back, we were always made very aware that what we had was a privilege and an opportunity, not a right or an entitlement.
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Daily life for me, growing up in upper class suburbia where a Range Rover every three feet and cell phones for every fifth grader was the norm, could be related to that of growing up in a bubble. Had my parents not instilled in me the values that they did, I would have had no concept of what else life could be like. Most children in my town were unaware that children our age woke up and went to bed hungry. My childhood interactions with other people in my town who had the same as me was very simple. The biggest problem on the playground was a paper cut, instead of shooting; the biggest problem over dinner was not eating the vegetables, instead of starvation; and the biggest problem getting dressed in the morning was being unable to match, instead of not having clothes. My mother decided when I was very young that I should interact with children in homeless shelters, working through our temple to assist with meals on wheels
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course FMSC 381 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at Maryland.

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FMSC381budgetanalysispaper - Amanda Fachler FMSC381 Poverty...

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