16-03-Presentation-Nietzsche.pptx - Nietzsche Above Humans...

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Copyright © Peter Bornedal Nietzsche: Above Humans and Gods On Nietzsche’s Theories of Knowledge, Morality, Slave/Master, and Nihilism Copyright(C) by Peter Bornedal
FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE German philosopher Born 1844 Breakdown 1889 Death 1899 Seminal Works: The Birth of Tragedy Human, All-too-Human The Cheerful Science Thus Spoke Zarathustra Beyond Good and Evil The Genealogy of Morals The Will to Power: A Revaluation of all Values (1889, unfinished) Subjects of his philosophy : Literature, Art, Music, Culture, Religion, Ethics, Metaphysics, Epistemology, Mind, and Language. Themes of his philosophy : Criticism of Platonic Truth- Concepts; Introduction of Fragmented Subject; Revaluation of Values; Will to Power; Explanation of Morality; Criticism of Religion, esp. Christianity; Master and Slave; the Super-human; Eternal Recurrence of the Same. Copyright(C) by Peter Bornedal
Part 1: Knowledge Copyright(C) by Peter Bornedal
Nietzsche is criticizing ‘Truth’ understood in a universal, absolute, and metaphysical sense (not in a pragmatic sense). This notion originally derives from Plato, and implies that ‘Truth’ belongs in the world of ideal forms, not in the world of appearances. Splitting the world up into two, the world of ideal forms represents perfection and the world of appearances represents imperfection, Plato devaluates and depreciates the only world known to us, the world of appearances. Plato’s idea is inherited in Christianity, where the perfect world becomes the world beyond, the Kingdom of God, the Elysium, and the imperfect world, the existent world, nothing but a “wail of tears.” Nietzsche most general objection: there is no ideal world of forms , no transcendent world, no ‘hidden’ world. There is only the world we can see, the imperfect world of appearances; consequently, no heaven and no God. The invention of a perfect transcendent world is human self- deception. Therefore Nietzsche can say that the ‘will to truth’ is ‘will to deception.’ (BGE 2). Nietzsche is criticizing ‘Truth’ understood in a universal, absolute, and metaphysical sense (not in a pragmatic sense). This notion originally derives from Plato, and implies that ‘Truth’ belongs in the world of ideal forms, not in the world of appearances. Splitting the world up into two, the world of ideal forms represents perfection and the world of appearances represents imperfection, Plato devaluates and depreciates the only world known to us, the world of appearances. Plato’s idea is inherited in Christianity, where the perfect world becomes the world beyond, the Kingdom of God, the Elysium, and the imperfect world, the existent world, nothing but a “wail of tears.” Nietzsche most general objection: there is no ideal world of forms , no transcendent world, no ‘hidden’ world. There is only the world we can see, the imperfect world of appearances; consequently, no heaven and no God.

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