Chapter 4 Part 1 - Sensation (part 1) Today's topics...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Today’s topics Psychophysics The Functioning of the Senses Hearing Sensation (part 1)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sensation vs. Perception Chapter 4: Sensation Sensation Process by which physical energy from the environment is detected by the sense receptors and then encoded as neural signals Perception Process by which we organize and interpret the sensory information, allowing us to give meaning to objects and events.
Background image of page 2
Psychophysics Chapter 4: Sensation Psychophysics the study of relationships between the physical characteristics of stimuli and our psychological experience of them.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Absolute (Detection) Threshold Chapter 4: Sensation Absolute threshold the minimum stimulation required to detect a particular stimulus 50% of the time.
Background image of page 4
Difference Threshold Chapter 4: Sensation Difference threshold (aka just noticeable difference ) – the minimum difference a person can detect between any two stimuli 50% of the time. Weber’s Law – to be perceived as different, two stimuli must differ by a constant proportion of that stimulus (depending on the type of stimulus!). Δ I I = C Sensory Modality Weber Fraction ( I / I) percentage Weight 1/50 2% Light intensity 1/60 1.67% Pain 1/30 3.3% Loudness 1/10 10% Frequency (pitch) 1/333 0.3%
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Signal Detection Theory Chapter 4: Sensation Traditional sensitivity measurement: present series of stimuli and ask subjects which ones they can detect However, their reports are based not only on sensitivity but on their decision criteria , which involves their motivation, expectations, consequences of detecting or not detecting Signal Detection Theory – an approach to threshold measurement that is sensitive to the other issues involved in whether or not we detect a stimulus. When detecting a stimulus, there are 4 possible outcomes
Background image of page 6
Responding when Detecting a Signal Chapter 4: Sensation On every trial, you’re forced into a decision (yes or no) Response bias – a preference for one response or the other Example : audio signal detection (lab experiment) With most very weak tones, Matt responds “yes, I heard it”
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/23/2010 for the course SOCIAL SCI 68045 taught by Professor Hagedorn during the Fall '09 term at UC Irvine.

Page1 / 23

Chapter 4 Part 1 - Sensation (part 1) Today's topics...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online