Chapter 4 Part 2 - Sensation (part 2) Today's topics Vision...

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Today’s topics Vision Sensation (part 2)
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Stimulus: Electromagnetic Energy Chapter 4: Sensation Electromagnetic energy Hue - determined by wavelength - the distance from one wave peak to the next - visible light between 400-700nm Intensity - determined by wave’s amplitude - determines brightness of colors
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The Eye Chapter 4: Sensation Cornea - where light enters the eye - protects eye - bends light to help focus Pupil - small, adjustable opening Lens - helps focus incoming rays onto retina Retina - light-sensitive inner surface onto which light rays focus
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Focusing and Accommodation Chapter 4: Sensation Looking at a spot more than 20 ft away - light rays essentially parallel - light rays focus to nice, sharp point on retina If we move the spot closer to our eye - if lens stays same shape (bending light rays the same amount as before), our point would come into focus somewhere BEHIND the retina! - we need to bend the light rays more accommodation - changing shape of the lens - when muscles around lens contract, lens bulges out and bends light more - When muscles around lens relax, lens flattens and bends light less
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Retina Chapter 4: Sensation
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Blind Spot Chapter 4: Sensation We have a blind spot where the optic nerve exits each eye The optic nerve leaves the eye on the nasal side of the eye, causing a blind spot in the left visual field for our left eye and our right visual field for our right eye However, we’re normally not aware of the blind spot - when an object is in ONE blind spot, it’s not in the other - the location of the blind spot on the retina is not in sharp focus - the visual system has a mechanism that “fills in” the place where the image disappears
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Duplex Theory of Vision Chapter 4: Sensation Duplex theory we have two receptor types (rods and cones) and they handle different aspects of vision Cones color vision day vision (high levels of illumination) Rods black and white (achromatic) vision night vision (low levels of illumination)
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2010 for the course SOCIAL SCI 68045 taught by Professor Hagedorn during the Fall '09 term at UC Irvine.

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Chapter 4 Part 2 - Sensation (part 2) Today's topics Vision...

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