Chapter 6 Part 1 - Learning (part 1) Today's topics...

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Today’s topics Habituation Classical Conditioning Learning (part 1)
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Habituation Chapter 6: Habituation Habituation the gradual decrease in the size of response to a stimulus due to repeated exposure to that stimulus Examples: ticking clock constant air traffic overhead Habituation allows us to focus our attention on what is important without being distracted by stimuli that don’t matter has survival value (e.g. deer in the woods) once we establish that repetitive stimuli are not threatening, there’s no reason to keep paying attention to them we don’t necessarily habituate to a stimulus forever
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Dishabituation Chapter 6: Habituation Dishabituation when an organism begins to respond more intensely to a stimulus to which it had previously habituated Example – listening to a lecture: • someone hammering outside room • once we realize it’s not a threat, we’ll habituate • however, if the stimulus changes somehow (e.g. louder, different location), you’ll dishabituate and start paying attention again • once you realize new (changed) stimulus is no threat, you’ll probably habituate to new sound • passage of time can also cause dishabituation (e.g. worker takes a break, but them comes back a bit later) – wouldn’t last long though, and you’d soon return your attention to the lecture
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Associative Learning Chapter 6: Classical Conditioning Habituation very simple type of learning doesn’t explain most of what we learn nonassociative learning Associative learning learning that two events occur together Most of our learning is done through association
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Classical Conditioning Chapter 6: Classical Conditioning Classical conditioning – type of learning in which an organism comes to associate stimuli, and thus to anticipate events. The work of Ivan Pavlov led to the understanding of classical conditioning.
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Ivan Pavlov Chapter 6: Classical Conditioning Studied salivary secretion in dogs - put food in dog’s mouth, it salivates - soon, dog salivated to stimuli associated with food - an important form of learning is going on!
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Chapter 6: Classical Conditioning Experiment - Pair a neutral stimulus with food presentation - will the dog associate the two stimuli (neutral stimulus and food)? - will the neutral stimulus
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2010 for the course SOCIAL SCI 68045 taught by Professor Hagedorn during the Fall '09 term at UC Irvine.

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Chapter 6 Part 1 - Learning (part 1) Today's topics...

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