Lec. 4 (1-14-10) - Memory 3 Blocking vs. Amnesia,...

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1 Memory 3 Psych 9B -- PSB 11B 1 Memory 3 Blocking vs. Amnesia, Inhibition, and Repression Misattribution
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2 Psych 9B -- PSB 11B 2 Memory 3 Blocking vs. Amnesia, Inhibition, and Repression ± Blocking: A temporary failure of retrieval cues to elicit specific information that is in memory ± How is this related to the phenomena described by other terms used to refer to problems accessing memory: e.g., Amnesia, Inhibition, and Repression
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3 Psych 9B -- PSB 11B 3 Memory 3 ± In March 1998, 20 year-old Cynthia Anthony pleaded not guilty in a Toronto court to the murder of her 10 day-old baby. Anthony claimed that she had tripped over a cable TV cord and dropped the baby on hard ceramic tile. However, when initially questioned by police, she did not mention this accident. ± Can you imagine that this story is accurate? A. Yes, I can easily imagine how something like this could happen B. Yes, although implausible, I guess it is possible that this might happen C. No, I can’t imagine how this could happen
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4 Psych 9B -- PSB 11B 4 Memory 3 The Case of Cynthia Anthony ± At the trial, Anthony explained that she had been "in shock" as a result of the horrific incident and had "blocked it" from her memory. She explained to the jury that she had recovered the memory only months later when she was looking at photographs of the baby. ± A psychiatrist testified that: "The enormity of the tragedy she suffered may have rendered her more vulnerable to amnesia.“ ± A jury found her not guilty
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5 Psych 9B -- PSB 11B 5 Memory 3 Cynthia Anthony: Amnesia, Blocking, ?? ± Can we understand Anthony’s story as amnesia? ² “Amnesia” usually refers to consolidation amnesia ± Resulting from head injury, alcohol, drugs, or loss of consciousness ± Not selective: all memories from a period before (and sometimes just after) the trauma are lost ± Can we understand this as severe instance of some form of blocking? ² Anthony stated that her memory for the event returned after exposure to a strong cue
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6 Psych 9B -- PSB 11B 6 Memory 3 A Thought Experiment ± You are shown a list of words drawn from several categories such as fruits or birds: e.g., apple canary robin pear crow banana ± At the start of a subsequent memory test, I provide you as a retrieval aid, two of the words from the list: e.g., pear and canary
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7 Psych 9B -- PSB 11B 7 Memory 3 ± Do you think that providing pear and canary as a retrieval aid will increase recall of the other words, compared to a test in which I do not provide any words from the study list as retrieval aids? The probability of recalling the remaining words will A. Remain unchanged B. Decrease C. Increase
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8 Psych 9B -- PSB 11B 8 Memory 3 A Second Thought Experiment ± Imagine that after studying word pairs such as red / blood and food / radish , you are given red as a cue and successfully recall that blood went with it.
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2010 for the course SOCIAL SCI 68100 taught by Professor Wright during the Winter '10 term at UC Irvine.

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Lec. 4 (1-14-10) - Memory 3 Blocking vs. Amnesia,...

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