Lect1_intro_to_PR - Lecture 1 Introduction Outline 1...

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Lecture note, Stat231-CS276A, © S.C.Zhu Lecture 1: Outline: 1. Patterns in nature: a continuous spectrum from the regular to the stochastic. 2. Applications of pattern recognition 3. Schools of thought in pattern recognition 4. A simplistic example of pattern recognition 5. Overview of the three course projects Introduction
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Lecture note, Stat231-CS276A, © S.C.Zhu Examples of Patterns Crystal patterns at atomic and molecular levels These structures can be represented by graphs or by grammars. This is often called syntactic pattern recognition with generative models One may view a compiler for a programming language (e.g. matlab, c) as a syntactic pattern recognition system. A syntactic pattern recognition system not only classifies the label, but also extracts hierarchical (compositional) structures .
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Lecture note, Stat231-CS276A, © S.C.Zhu Examples of Patterns Constellation patterns in the sky are represented by 2D (often planar) graphs. Finding patterns helps encoding the signals. Human perception has a strong tendency to find patterns from almost anything. We see patterns from even random noise (psychology evidence) --- we are more likely to believe a hidden pattern than denying it when the risk (reward) for missing (discovering) a pattern is often high . This is an important aspect in pattern discovery . It will be formulated in the Bayesian decision theory --- considering the risk of classification.
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Lecture note, Stat231-CS276A, © S.C.Zhu Examples of Patterns Biology patterns --- study in morphology and biometrics (Human ID becomes an industry) Landmarks (keypoints) are identified and matched between instances. Applications include biometrics, computational anatomy, brain mapping, forensics (fingerprint was first used in 1905 for solving a murder case, now it is used for all kinds of ID systems). But for other forms, like the root of plants, points cannot be registered crossing instances. They are described by stochastic models .
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© S.C.Zhu Examples of Patterns Pattern discovery and association: In plain language, a pattern often mean a set of instances associated with (or caused by) some underlying factors. Statistics show connections between the shape of one’s face (adults) and his/her Character. There is also evidence that the outline of children’s face is related to alcohol abuse during pregnancy. With fMRI, we now can look the internal patterns of brain activity and find
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Lect1_intro_to_PR - Lecture 1 Introduction Outline 1...

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