TOPIC1 - William Chang 10/15/10 English 213 Ice in...

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William Chang 10/15/10 English 213 Ice in Sculpting Frankenstein The construction of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is based on an epistolary foundation. On top of the foundation are the several frames that make up the structure of the novel. Frankenstein, Walton, and the creature all incorporate their stories into the overall structure of the novel. Throughout the construction of this framework, there are crucial scenes in which the characters meet on the ice. This figure of ice is seen in the beginning, middle, and end of the novel. Although it is literally a landscape feature, ice serves to shift and transition the perspective of the narration. Just like how physical ice can layer and fracture, the figure of ice layers these stories to provide a blank slate for the three characters to plead their sympathetic cases. As the narrative starts, we see Walton and his crew drifting amid the sheets of ice. The setting is dreary and frigid. Walton writes in a series a letters his lonely sentiments. Walton states, "I greatly need a friend" and that he "shall certainly find no friend on the wide ocean" (53). With regards to Walton, this figure of ice is essentially a blank slate, one in which a story
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TOPIC1 - William Chang 10/15/10 English 213 Ice in...

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