{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lesson 4 - Unit 5 Lesson 4 The Abolitionist Movement Lesson...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Unit 5 Lesson 4 - The Abolitionist Movement Lesson Objective:  In this lesson, the student will:  analyze changing ideas about race and assess how pro slavery vs antislavery ideologies were received  in the North and South.  describe the fundamental beliefs of abolitionism and understand how the key figures of the Abolition  Movement influenced politics.  The Abolitionist Movement The antislavery movement in American began long before the tensions between the North and South of the  1800’s. Slavery was universally accepted in colonial America. However, in 1700 a minister named Samuel Sewall  published an antislavery book called  The Selling of Joseph . In Pennsylvania, the Quakers were the first to come  out against slavery. Quakers were also the first group in America to outlaw slavery and the first to organize a  society for the abolition of slavery. By the 1820’s there were over 100 abolitionist organizations in the nation.  Abolitionist Movement Gains Strength Most Northerners favored payment to slaveholders for their slaves but did not accept freed black slaves as equals.  Before the 1830’s the largest antislavery organization was the American Colonization Society. This chief goal of  this organization was to send blacks to Africa. The federal government helped by giving $100,000 to the Society  for the establishment of the republic of Liberia on the west coast of Africa. The capital was named Monrovia, after 
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern