comp sci review

comp sci review - Page design layouts A good layout is...

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Page design layouts - A good layout is critical to the reader’s comfort and ability to navigate - The reader will see the title or other detail of the page, and the overall pattern and contrast of the page. - Repetition is a key to navigation, to predict where information is likely to be located. Headings - Avoid using more than three - Few heading styles and subtitles are necessary to organize your content - If it looks simple, it will attract positive attention - With an outline, each first-level heading should have within it at least two second-level headings - If your document must have numbering system, keep the numbers lighter and smaller so that the text will stand out Subheadings - Should provide a break in the text - About twice as much space should appear above as appears below Grid - A grid functions as a spatial organization system that you can use to establish a standard layout - Commonly use a grid to permit faster layouts - The grid divides up the space clearly and provides a procedural guide - The grid is the basis for decisions, like a visual procedure - Match the format to the content, and keep it interesting
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Margins - It gives the reader a place for her thumbs to rest - Bring a balance to the page and should have a consistent relationship with the overall outline of the page - A combination of balance and contrast is key Runarounds - It does add eye relief - Need to adjust text to make sure headings do not fall into smack dab in the center of the runaround Justification - The rule is to set your document to ragged style if you have short lines, less than thirty-six characters. - Ragged-right Page numbers - Are navigational aids Line length - 60-70 characters per line maximum - 30 characters per line minimum - 10 average length words - Using long line length, set smaller type with larger spaces, called leading Line spacing - Is the white space between lines of text - Should widen as the width of the typed material increases
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- Different typefaces require significantly different amounts of space, vertical and horizontal. - Long ascenders and descenders, lowercase letters with descenders: g,j,p,q,y; lowercase letters with ascenders: b,d,f,h,k,l,t - Allow more spacing between lines if the “x-height” is taller - Arial has larger x-height and needs larger leading as a result Kerning - Many other measures associated with typesetting that can alter the look of the printed word - It is reassuring to know that you don’t need to be concerned about spacing between letters in a word Sentence spacing - Select spacing between sentences that works for you, and be consistent. -
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comp sci review - Page design layouts A good layout is...

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