Radio_frequency_identification_-__draft_three

Radio_frequency_identification_-__draft_three - RFID and...

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RFID and Privacy 1 Approaches for Privacy Protection When Adopting RFID Technology. Andre Silva Bellevue University Abstract
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Radio Frequency Identification is a data acquisition and storage method using the powerful combination of radio broadcast and digital coding technology to track the presence and location of data to improve speed, accuracy, efficiency, and security of information through the entire supply chain. Although viewed as a technology beneficial to organizations, some advocacy groups have raised issues to the use of RFID for privacy reasons. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss four recommendations that may solve these issues: 1) tag deactivation - in which tags are 1) disabled permanently or 2) put to sleep, and 2) shielding - where unauthorized scanning of items is 3) blocked by either using natural obstacles such as faraday cages made of certain metals, or 4) by transmitting jamming signals that would break or disturb the connection between RFID devices. Introduction 2 2
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RFID and Privacy Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a mix of radio broadcast and digital coding technology that consists of electronic tags including identification numbers or other digital encoded data on a microchip (Berger, 2005). The RFID system can monitor the presence and location of products containing this tag ID by using, for example, contact-less data transfer like smart cards. RFID technology has been used for more than 50 years, advancing business processes, access control, stealing prevention, automated payment, and supply chain management, etc. Given the high costs of tags, some manufacturers have decided to place tags just on packaging, whereas some others decided to place tags on all their products. Once a consumer purchases an RFID- tagged good and takes out the store, it can be tracked by the company to profile the consumer or by robbers to detect valued tagged goods. Many researches have been presented aimed at providing privacy and security solutions in RFID systems. However, existing available solutions don’t quite offer guarantees for privacy protection practices, especially in a personal use situation. There are many security and privacy issues linked to RFID that need to be addressed and solved. In this paper, some representative approaches for privacy protection will be presented to educate decision makers regarding security issues involving the use of RFID technology. Radio frequency identification Radio frequency identification (RFID) has been used since World War II when military aviation used the waves to track the enemies. This old technology, which sends serial numbers via electronic tags to reading devices able to store the unique information, has a communication architecture relying basically on two building blocks – tags and readers (Li, Visich & Khumawala, 2006). The tag itself comprises a small integrated circuit attached to a tiny antenna, which transmits its identification codes to reader machines several feet away. There are two 3
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types of tags: passive and active. The passive tags capture the signal through its own internal
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This note was uploaded on 11/25/2010 for the course CIS 631 taught by Professor Woods during the Spring '10 term at Bellevue.

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Radio_frequency_identification_-__draft_three - RFID and...

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