Imperialism_in_China.docx - Introduction \u27a1Directions Examine the maps below and complete the See-Think-Wonder chart East Asia 1789 East Asia 1837

Imperialism_in_China.docx - Introduction u27a1Directions...

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[- Introduction Directions: Examine the maps below and complete the See-Think-Wonder chart. East Asia, 1789 Source: Timemaps.com East Asia, 1837 Source: Timemaps.com East Asia, 1871 Source: Timemaps.com East Asia, 1914 Source: Timemaps.com See What do you see in the maps? Think What do you think changed in East Asia from the 17th to 20th centuries? I see lots black dots representing conquered land and advancements in the purple are which was known as Qing Empire but by 1914 it is called China What I think changed in East Asia from the 17 th to 20 th centuries is the technology, literature, economy and trading.
Document Analysis Activity: How did Europeans, the Japanese, and the United States gain, consolidate, and maintain power in China? Directions: Examine the videos, images, and text on imperialism in China and annotate as you read by highlighting examples of methods used by the Europeans to gain power in China in BLUE, examples of methods they used to consolidate their power in YELLOW, and examples of methods used to maintain power in GREEN. First Opium War (1839-1842) Watch this History Channel Clip about the Opium Wars from Mankind: The Story of All of Us and then read the information below. In the 19th century, the British had a trade imbalance with China, meaning that they were buying a lot of Chinese goods, but not selling very much to the Chinese. The main reason for this imbalance was that the British became a nation of tea drinkers and the demand for Chinese tea rose astronomically. It is estimated that the average London worker spent five percent of his or her total household budget on tea. To prevent a trade imbalance, the British tried to sell more of their own products to China, but there was not much demand for products like heavy woolen fabrics in a country accustomed to either cotton or silk clothing. Though the Qing Emperor declared that his country had no interest in European goods, the British found one product that they could profit from in China: opium. Opium is an addictive drug that comes from the poppy plant and is usually smoked. It is grown in regions of Central Asia that during the 18th, 19th, and part of the 20th century were a part of the British colony of India. The British did all they could to increase the trade. They bribed officials, Painting of The East India Company’s iron steam ship Nemesis , commanded by Lieutenant W. H. Hall, with boats from the Sulphur , Calliope , Larne and Starling , destroying the Chinese war junks in Anson’s Bay, on 7 January 1841 during the first Opium War. Image is courtesy of wikimedia commons and is in the public domain
helped the Chinese work out elaborate smuggling schemes to get the opium into China's interior, and distributed free samples of the drug to innocent victims. The cost to China was enormous. The drug weakened a large percentage of the population (some estimate that 10 percent of the population regularly used opium by the late nineteenth century), and silver began to flow out of the country to pay for the opium. Many

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