Assignment Physiology presentation ch 6 7 14

Assignment Physiology presentation ch 6 7 14 - Blood...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Blood Clotting, Immune Response, Allergic Reaction, and Hormone Release Tabitha Neufind HCA220 Rebecca Riznyk
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Blood Clotting When a blood vessel is injured the body will attempt to stop too much blood from being lost. This process is accomplished by solidifying the blood. This process is called coagulation. Coagulation involves the formation of a blood clot or a thrombus. This thrombus prevents further blood loss, damage to tissues, blood vessels, and organs. A thrombus is made of fibrin and platelets. Platelets are cells that “circulate in the blood and serve to form a platelet plug over damaged vessels” (University of Illinois, n.d). Platelets have three primary functions.” Sticking to injured blood vessels Attach to other blood platelets to create a larger blood clot. Support the process of the coagulation cascade” (University of Illinois, n.d). Fibrin is “the protein formed during normal blood clotting that is the essence of the clot” (Medicine.Net, 2010). The platelets and fibrin work together to form a blood clot.
Background image of page 2
How a Blood Clot Is Made When an injury occurs the blood vessel constricts to decrease the amount of blood flowing through the vessel. “Thrombocytes stick to the damaged area of the blood vessel wall and form clumps to block the blood flow” (Turley, 2007). The clotting process is activated in the plasma and fibrin is produced. The fibrin help to “trap erythrocytes and form a thrombus” (Turley, 2007). When bleeding is finally stopped this is known as homeostasis. The size of the blood clot is “limited by the action of heparin, a natural anticoagulant” (Turley, 2007).
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Immune System The immune system is composed of these 10 body organs or systems. o Skin o Adenoids o Tonsils o Thymus o Lymph System o Lymph Nodes o Spleen o Appendix o Intestinal Lymph Nodes o Bone Marrow
Background image of page 4
The Immune Response The immune response is a effort that is coordinated by both the blood and the lymphatic system to destroy foreign bodies. The immune response begins with the detection of a foreign body such as a microorganism or even cancerous cells within the body. Once a microorganism has been detected in the blood or lymphatic system there are several methods the body uses to attack. Cytokines is a chemical that injured tissue in the body releases that will summon leukocytes to the area. Neutrophils swamp
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/27/2010 for the course HCA 220 220 taught by Professor Sumpter during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

Page1 / 12

Assignment Physiology presentation ch 6 7 14 - Blood...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online