Lecture 01-Java Types, Expressions, and Assignment

Lecture 01-Java Types, Expressions, and Assignment -...

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1 CS1110. Lecture 1, 31 Aug 2010. Types, expressions, variables, assignment statements Can’t install DrJava and running a Microsoft operating system? Contact TA Prabhjeet Singh, [email protected] Quote for the day: Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons. --Popular Mechanics, forecasting the relentless march of science, 1949 Not getting email from us via the CS1110 CMS? Then either: 1. You are not registered in the CMS. Email Maria Witlox [email protected] and ask her to register you. She needs your netid. 2. Your email is bouncing : (some are: tariq.mozaini, lukeg432, dc.mcmurtry10, khyjhcho,com, cabooserwar, lacktora4546) . Your Cornell email information is not set up correctly or the place to which you forward it is having trouble. Best thing to do: email yourself, at [email protected] , see what happens, and fix it. Orange: update from handout
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Interlude: Why learn to program? (which is subtly distinct from, although a core part of, computer science itself) 2 From the Economist: “Teach computing, not Word” http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2010/08/computing_schools Like philosophy, computing qua computing is worth teaching less for the subject matter itself and more for the habits of mind that studying it encourages. The best way to encourage interest in computing in school is to ditch the vocational stuff that strangles the subject currently, give the kids a simple programming language, and then get out of the way and let them experiment. For some, at least, it could be the start of a life-long love affair.
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Interlude, continued 3 That, for me, sums up the seductive intellectual core of computers and computer programming: here is a magic black box. You can tell it to do whatever you want, within a certain set of rules, and it will do it; within the confines of the box you
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This note was uploaded on 11/27/2010 for the course CS 9339 taught by Professor Gries during the Fall '09 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lecture 01-Java Types, Expressions, and Assignment -...

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