Biology - Lecture - Ch 6 - Cellular Respiration

Biology - Lecture - Ch 6 - Cellular Respiration - Chapter 6...

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Cellular Respiration Chapter 6
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6.1 The Chemical Basis of Cellular Respiration a. Food as fuel a. The principle of redox a. Cellular respiration is controlled combustion
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Energy Flow The Sun Ultimate source of energy Photosynthesis Captures energy of light Converts it to chemical energy --> complex organic molecules WHY???? Body’s Fuel
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Energy Flow Fig. 6-1, p. 116
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What do gasoline and glucose have in common? Abundance of carbon-hydrogen bonds Fig. 6-2, p. 116 Good source of energy
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Energy Levels of Electrons of an Atom Fig. 6-3, p. 117 What kind of bond is a C-H bond? Nonpolar covalent Electrons are from nuclei. When C-H bonds break, lots of energy is released equidistant
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How do we get the energy that is stored in organic molecules? oxidize it --> remove electrons electrons Donor is oxidized - lose electrons Acceptor is reduced - gains electrons Reduction-oxidation reactions (REDOX) Transfer electrons from donor to acceptor atoms
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Redox Reactions Fig. 6-4, p. 117 Why? electronegativities equal Sharing unequal Sharing
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Cellular Respiration Organisms obtain energy by oxidizing organic molecules produced by photosynthesis in a series of reactions Energy released in oxidations is captured in ATP C 6 H 12 O 6 + 6 O 2 + 32 ADP + 32 P i 6 H 2 O + 6 CO 2 + 32 ATP
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Cellular Respiration is Controlled Combustion Fig. 6-5, p. 118 Same G different E A
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Energy Transfer Electrons lose energy as they pass from donor to acceptor molecule Released energy is free energy that can do work In cellular respiration End result is synthesis of ATP
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Electron Carrier NAD + Fig. 6-6, p. 118
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Cellular Respiration: 3 Stages 1. Glycolysis 2. Citric acid cycle 3. Electron transport and chemiosmosis
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1. Glycolysis Glucose is converted: to 2 molecules of pyruvate Through series of enzyme-catalyzed reactions ATP and NADH is synthesized
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2. Citric Acid Cycle Oxidize pyruvate acetyl coenzyme A ( acetyl-CoA ) Enters metabolic cycle Oxidized completely to carbond dioxide Synthesis of ATP , NADH and FADH 2
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3. Electron Transport and Chemiosmosis NADH synthesized by glycolysis and citric acid cycle is oxidized (also FADH 2 ) Liberated electrons pass along electron transport chain Electrons transferred to O 2 --> water Free energy establishes proton gradient across membrane Drives synthesis of ATP
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