1298495_Contextual_Observation_and_Analysis

1298495_Contextual_O - Observation and Analysis Running head THE CONTEXTUAL OBSERVATION AND ANALYSIS 1 The Contextual Observation and

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Observation and Analysis 1 Running head: THE CONTEXTUAL OBSERVATION AND ANALYSIS The Contextual Observation and Analysis [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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Observation and Analysis 2 The Contextual Observation and Analysis The number and quality of educational programs for adults has sharply increased during the past twenty years. While how-to program descriptions, single-focus studies of particular programs, and general research on the benefits of education for seniors are increasingly available, there are fewer broad-based investigations of newly emerging programs for adult learners or of the organizational forms they have taken. Of those serving local seniors in their communities, five models have shown distinctive growth, stability, and innovation during the past two to three decades. 1. College- and university-based LRIs, like the NCCCR's College for Seniors, which invite members to share in administrating, governing, and teaching and now number over two hundred with twenty-five new institutes starting each year. 2. Department store-based OASIS institutes, located in some twenty-eight department stores owned by the May Company of St. Louis and attracting over 125,000 people yearly to arts, humanities, health promotion, and volunteer service programs 3. Shepherd's Centers, volunteer-driven coalitions of religious congregations providing services and programs, now boast almost 100 local sites that include the intellectually- stimulating Adventures in Learning program.
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Observation and Analysis 3 4. Community colleges which have attracted thousands of seniors among their constituencies since the early 1970s; in many states, they supplied classes through senior centers at little or no cost. A shortage of state funds in the late 1980s limited or reduced the number of these offerings, but special courses targeted to seniors continue. Some community colleges are shifting to LRI-type member-directed institutes. (McGowan T. G., S. Blankenship. 1994) 5. Senior centers, which have long provided a wide variety of educational programs ranging from nutrition and consumer education to arts and crafts. As might be expected of some 12,000 sites across the country, the professional quality of instruction has been uneven. In a fairly recent trend, some senior centers are moving toward more substantive educational programs that go beyond a recreational level, as exemplified by Senior Neighbors of Chattanooga. (Drenning S., L. Getz. 1992) Adult education programs established during the last two decades depart from earlier models that tended to offer episodic programs dependent on the contingencies of outside funding. Instead, they are financially viable, evolving organizations with track records that reach back five, ten, fifteen years, or longer. LRIs, OASIS sites, and Shepherd's Center programs are securely established in host institutions with relatively stable
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Observation and Analysis 4 funding through membership fees and in-kind institutional support. Many of these organizations have embraced the concept of
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MIS 1793 taught by Professor Stevealex during the Spring '10 term at Windsor.

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1298495_Contextual_O - Observation and Analysis Running head THE CONTEXTUAL OBSERVATION AND ANALYSIS 1 The Contextual Observation and

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