3392887-Public Broadcasting

3392887-Public Broadcasting - Public Broadcasting Running...

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Public Broadcasting 1 Running head: PUBLIC BROADCASTING Public Broadcasting [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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Public Broadcasting 2 Public Broadcasting During the 1980s the proliferation of new technologies transformed the potential of the news media to provide a constant flow of global real-time news. Tiananmen Square and the collapse of communism, symbolized by the fall of the Berlin Wall, became major media events communicated to Western audiences instantaneously via TV news media. By the end of the decade the question being asked was to what extent had this 'media pervasiveness' impacted upon government - particularly the process of foreign policy-making. New technologies appeared to reduce the scope for calm deliberation over policy, forcing policy-makers to respond to whatever issue journalists focused on. This perception was in turn reinforced by the end of the bipolar order and what many viewed as the collapse of the old anti-communist consensus which, it was argued, had led to the creation of an ideological bond, uniting policy-makers and journalists. Released from the 'prism of the Cold War' journalists were, it was presumed, freer not just to cover the stories they wanted but to criticize US foreign policy as well. For radical technological optimists these developments suggested the realization of a genuine 'global village' in which the news media were helping to erode people's identification with the state and instead 'mold a cosmopolitan global consciousness'. Since the end of the Cold War the increasing willingness of Western governments to intervene militarily during humanitarian crises, coupled with significant levels of Western media attention to the human consequences of 'distant' civil wars, raises substantive questions regarding the media-state relationship. Specifically, it is commonly argued that intervention during the humanitarian crises in northern Iraq (1991) and Somalia (1992) were partially driven by news media coverage of suffering people, the news coverage of CNN. The principal aim is to examine the assumptions lying behind the CNN news coverage by conducting a search for evidence of
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Public Broadcasting 3 news media influence on intervention during humanitarian crises. Rather the focus is on one variable, the media, which are widely understood to play an important role in influencing US-led intervention. Understanding what motivates the US to act is central to understanding the CNN news coverage because the majority of forcible interventions have occurred under the command and leadership of the US. As such the research findings are of value to those in humanitarian and foreign policy circles, those who seek to harness the potential of news media to facilitate
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MIS 1793 taught by Professor Stevealex during the Spring '10 term at Windsor.

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3392887-Public Broadcasting - Public Broadcasting Running...

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