4359229_Total_Quality_Management

4359229_Total_Quality_Management - Total Quality Management...

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Total Quality Management 1 Running head: TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT Total Quality Management [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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Total Quality Management 2 Quality is an idea whose time has come. It is on everyone's lips. In the UK we have the Citizen's Charter, the Business Excellence Model and the Investors in People standard, while the United States has the Malcolm Baldrige Award and the Japanese have the Deming Prize. The European Foundation for Quality Management has developed the successful European Quality Award, while internationally there is the important International Standard ISO9000 series. These are just some of the more influential quality awards and standards that have been introduced in recent years to promote quality and excellence in a wide range of industries and services. This new consciousness of quality has now reached education; educational institutions are being required to develop their own approaches to quality, and need to demonstrate publicly that they too can deliver a consistent quality service. No longer are quality, quality assurance, total quality and TQM new initiatives or another set of fads designed to add to the workload of already over-worked teachers and under-funded institutions. While initiative fatigue has been a symptom of a hard-pressed education system for the past decade, quality improvement should not be seen in this light, but rather as a set of tools to help teachers and educational managers. To investigate how the quality movement started, we need to understand its origins in industry. It is from industry that the language, concepts and the methodology of TQM are derived. There has always been a need to ensure that products conform to their specification and give customer satisfaction and value for money. Achieving consistent quality allows consumers to have confidence in a product and its producers. The marks of gold- and silversmiths are evidence of this long-standing concern. Quality assurance became an issue with the advent of industrialization. Prior to this craftsmen set and maintained their own standards, on which their reputations and livelihoods depended. They established guilds that regulated quality and developed apprenticeship programmes that ensured that there was proper training and regulation in the craft. The advent of mass-production changed the emphasis completely. No longer were individuals responsible for making whole products. Instead the manufacturing process broke down work into narrow and repetitive tasks. Importantly for our discussion, it took away from the worker the possibility of self-checking quality. One essential feature of a craft, the responsibility of the worker for the quality of the product, was lost when goods were mass-produced. New production methods, associated with the scientific approach to management and the name of F W Taylor, at the turn of the twentieth
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Total Quality Management 3 century, reduced many in the workforce to human components in the process of manufacture. A
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MBA_W MBA-147822 taught by Professor Anne during the Spring '09 term at Windsor.

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4359229_Total_Quality_Management - Total Quality Management...

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