5344893_MANAGEMENT_Recruitment_Selection

5344893_MANAGEMENT_Recruitment_Selection - Recruitment and...

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Recruitment and Selection 1 Running head: RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION Recruitment and Selection [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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Recruitment and Selection 2 Recruitment and Selection Like minimum wages, hiring and separation costs induce labor market rigidities. However, the link between these labor market rigidities and the high British unemployment rate is difficult to assess. In particular increased flows into and out of unemployment do not necessarily imply a higher unemployment rate. Hence, just because there is a strong incentive to reduce adjustment costs and to increase the flows into and out of employment by the use of CDD employment contracts in U.K., the equilibrium rate of unemployment is not necessarily higher. Age discrimination is still rife in the UK, despite the introduction of strict new legislation more than six months ago. A study shows that almost two-thirds of workers think the new antiageism laws have made little or no difference to the way people are recruited. One-fifth of Britons believe that their age has actively prevented them from getting a job, with the situation becoming so serious that 22% would consider lying when applying for a position. The research, produced by the Employers Forum on Age (EFA) and Procter & Gamble, claims that 12% of workers have experienced age discrimination since the new laws were put in place last year. Sam Mercer, the EFA's director, said ingrained attitudes towards age still needed to change. "It is disappointing to find that so many people are still falling victim to ageism at work. "It just goes to show that a change in
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Recruitment and Selection 3 the law is merely the first step in a long journey towards tackling endemic social prejudices -- as we've seen before with gender and race legislation," she said. Surprisingly, the study suggests that ageism is most pronounced for younger people, with complaints higher among the 16-24 and 25-34 year old age groups. Mercer claims the EFA regularly uncovers age discrimination in the recruitment process, despite the specific bans put in place by the law. "We still regularly spot job advertisements that contravene the regulations, asking for 'young professionals', 'recent graduates', 'young talents', and 'mature candidates', or saying that salary will be offered depending on 'age and experience'," she added. (Employers Law, 2007) It appears that both retirement and termination costs are increasing and mildly concave in the number of retired or terminated workers. (Anderson, Meyer, 1994) Furthermore, the fixed costs are very large, giving the firm an incentive to group exits instead of adjusting gradually. Termination costs are largest for collective terminations as opposed to individual ones. These costs are largest for highly skilled employees. Hiring costs also exhibit the same structure; concave adjustment
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MBA_W MBA-147822 taught by Professor Anne during the Spring '09 term at Windsor.

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5344893_MANAGEMENT_Recruitment_Selection - Recruitment and...

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