9173889_Management

9173889_Management - Management Running head: Management 1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Management 1 Running head: Management Management [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Management 2 Management Teams are a fact of life. From medicine to aviation to the policeman on the beat, from management to modern warfare to the Superbowl clash, teams carry out much of the work (and some of the recreation) in our world. Broad outcome measures of the teams' performance are generally available (e.g., the plane landed safely and on time; the team won six games, lost nine). Individual tasks within the teams may be sufficiently delineated so that individual performance may, to some extent, be evaluated (e.g., the pitcher pitched a no-hitter; the pilot gave a thorough briefing to the crew). Despite the reliance on teams for much that is accomplished in our society, there is still little known about the processes that occur within a team that help account for real differences in outcomes. There has been considerable research interest in teams in recent years. In aviation, a recognition of the importance of the crews that are responsible for achieving a safe, efficient flight has prompted research into how they function ( Wiener, Kanki, & Helmreich, 1993). Military interest in teams other than aviation teams has been responsible for a large-scale research effort in team decision making ( Cannon-Bowers, Salas, & Grossman, 1991). There is also a widespread recognition that much of the work accomplished in business and industry is the result of teams ( Sundstrom, De Meuse, & Futrell, 1990). As a
Background image of page 2
3 result, a wide variety of teams have been studied and various approaches to team measurements have been applied. The distinction between groups and teams is often unclear, although the terms group and team have been used to describe rather different entities. Group has been used in a much broader sense than team and has been applied to a larger number of social and organizational forms ( Hackman, 1990). Group dynamics research, for example, has focused on therapy groups, T-groups, and self-study groups, where the task of each member was to achieve personal goals. Hackman ( 1990) stated that group is a rather generic label and needs to be differentiated from work groups that can be defined by certain criteria. These criteria include differentiated roles and tasks to be performed. We define a team to be two or more people with different tasks who work together adaptively to achieve specified and shared goals. The central feature of teamwork is coordination. Coordination means that there is some kind of adjustment that one or more of the team members makes so that the goal is reached. Teams' functional requirements always include simultaneity, sequencing, or both. Simultaneity means that team members must do something at the same time, such as play different notes in an orchestra. Sequencing means that the output of one team member's task or
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MBA_W MBA-147822 taught by Professor Anne during the Spring '09 term at Windsor.

Page1 / 17

9173889_Management - Management Running head: Management 1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online