1112196501-Cross Cultural Marketing

1112196501-Cross Cultural Marketing - Cross Cultural...

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Cross Cultural Marketing 1 Running head: CROSS CULTURAL MARKETING Cross Cultural Marketing [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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Cross Cultural Marketing 2 Cross Cultural Marketing All products are cultural artefacts, so selling and buying them is mostly a matter of communication. Products may be understood as utilities, symbols of social status, representations of personal characteristics of the owner, and/ or reflections of the person's choices of lifestyle. Products have social uses - they have social meaning and value within a particular cultural milieu. Our social values, fashions, and lifestyles are nowadays articulated through our choice of products. At the same time, commercial media are vital agencies of socialization. What greater justification can there be for marketers and their managers and critics to understand that marketing is a cultural enterprise and communication must be understood for the purpose of connecting intercultural life experiences in mutually beneficial exchanges of value? Deregulation, including the abolition of trade barriers, together with accelerating changes in communication and computer technology have reinforced the movement towards the globalization of business in an integrated market. Increasingly, producers compete in an international market, while markets themselves are becoming transnational. Germany and Japan have overtaken France and the UK as economic leaders, while the European Union matches the USA as an economic power. Latin America is putting forward vibrant economies. The four tiger economies of Singapore, Taiwan, Hong
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Cross Cultural Marketing 3 Kong, and South Korea, along with China, India, and Indonesia are accelerating. The world's focal point of economic weight and performance is shifting. There is no longer an East separated from the West. Technological advances have rendered national boundaries more open. While states retain sovereignty, governmental authority is eroding. The corporation is colonizing more of our lives, although not everyone lives in the world of media communication. In 1992, for example, annual sales of General Motors and Exxon each exceeded the gross national products of Saudi Arabia, Indonesia, Norway, Pakistan, Nigeria, and Egypt. Travel to almost any city and you will be able to find a McDonald's outlet and pervasive Coca-Cola advertising. Foreign cultures and lifestyles are exposed through transnational media. Money and information now flow around the globe. Corporations are buying, selling, and investing in the growth regions - without having to relocate people. Consumer buying patterns are changing, so that Nike wearers have more in common with each other than with their parents or cultural background. Global marketing is heading towards homogeneous buying patterns. Thinking globally requires understanding markets in terms of
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MBA_W MBA-147822 taught by Professor Anne during the Spring '09 term at Windsor.

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1112196501-Cross Cultural Marketing - Cross Cultural...

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