1212197468-Aimé Césaire's “A Tempest”

1212197468-Aimé Césaire's “A Tempest”

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Author’s Last Name 1 [Author’s Name] [Professor’s Name] [Course title] [Date] Aimé Césaire's “A Tempest” In every work of Aimé Césaire's the relation of language, words, and ethnicity is explicitly discussed. In A Tempest, an adaptation of Shakespeare's The Tempest for Black Theatre, Ariel, a mulatto sprite, is a hesitant intellectual and indentured servant to Prospero, the magician colonizer of an island inhabited by Caliban, a black radicalized native who has been taught his master's language. In Ariel and Caliban, the spectator-reader recognizes Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, respectively, and the play addresses the imperial will to power in the Americas. 'The tone is tragicomic. Caliban (phonetic echo of "cariban" and anagram of cannibal) uses his newly imposed language to curse his master rather than to sing his praises. Césaire saw in Shakespeare, Prospero, and Caliban the paradigm of the relationship between the colonizer and the colonized, the master and the slave. Caliban is also aware of the foreign worldview (weltanschauung) that resonates in every syllable of the language of this newly arrived oppressor:
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Author’s Last Name 2 A TEMPEST Caliban enters Caliban : Uhuru. Prospero : What are you saying? Caliban : I am saying Uhuru. Prospero : Ah, once again your barbarous language is surfacing. How many times have I told you that I do not approve of it? Besides, you could be courteous, a polite hello would not kill you. Caliban : Ah! I forgot myself. . . . Hello . . . But a Hello covered as much as possible with wasps, toads, running sores, and shit. Let today hasten by ten years the day when birds of prey from the sky and the wild beasts of the earth satisfy their appetite on your rotting carcass. Prospero : Ever the gracious spirit, I see, you wretched monkey. How can one be so ugly? Caliban : So you find me ugly. Well, I don't find you cute at all, with your hook nose you look like an old vulture. Hee Hee! Yes an old vulture with a skinny shaven neck! Prospero : Since you have mastered the art of curses and insults, perhaps you wish to bless me for having so masterfully taught you the art of speech. A barbarian. A brutish beast that I have trained, educated, that I have
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Author’s Last Name 3 lifted up from the base animal instincts that still defile your being through and through. Caliban : First of all, none of that is true! You have taught me absolutely nothing. Except, of course to jabber a few words in order to obey your orders: cut the wood, wash the dishes, fish, plant the vegetables, because you are too lazy to do it. Now as for your science and technology, have you ever taught me any of that, huh! Ho Ho, you have taken great pain to keep that to yourself. Your science and technology you have quite egotistically kept for you and yourself alone, locked up in those big books over there. Prospero
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1212197468-Aimé Césaire's “A Tempest”

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