PROJECT PLANNING IN TEAMS

PROJECT PLANNING IN TEAMS - Project Planning Running head:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Project Planning 1 Running head: PROJECT PLANNING IN TEAMS Project Planning in Teams [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Project Planning 2 Table of Contents
Background image of page 2
Project Planning 3 Project Planning in Teams Introduction In almost all spheres of life, the value of teamwork in getting work done is increasingly becoming recognized. The creation of effective project teams requires much planning because in a team each and every individual is quite different to others. Project planning in teams is best done as a collaborative effort in which the give and take among the team members helps to ensure that the plan is realistic, complete, and as effective as possible. Input from and ultimate acceptance of the plan by others -- project performers, internal clients, functional department managers, vendors, support people, and sponsors -- are critical. These stakeholders must buy-in and commit to their parts of the plan. Discussions Progressively more, managers are recognizing that teamwork is a critical element in effective management. Whether the challenge is to design and implement a new management information system, improve service quality processes, or plan and carry out an office move, a well structured and managed project team can spell the difference between success and disaster. In today's competitive environment most organizations need to be successful to survive.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Project Planning 4 It is a major undertaking to simply define the product, without regard to time, cost, processes, and resources. But, in real world projects, the product definition is often significantly influenced by these factors. (Charvat, Jason 2001)The type of resources (human and other) that are available to create the product may influence the product design. (Design for maintainability is an example.) The time available and the cost constraints for the project will influence the number of features and functions and the behavioral characteristics of the product or the planned commissioning (or introduction) of the product. Key Factors While there are situations in which the product definition is fixed, more often than not there is some degree of flexibility. In other words, the product definition is a function of the business objectives, time, cost resources, and process. This is a variation on this author's estimating algorithm: "Schedule and budget are functions of the product, resources, technique (process) and environment (another aspect of process)." (Lewis, James P. 1999)
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 10

PROJECT PLANNING IN TEAMS - Project Planning Running head:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online