French_and_Indian_War

French_and_Indian_Wa - French and Indian War Running head FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR 1 French and Indian War[Authors Name[Institutions Name French and

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French and Indian War 1 Running head: FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR French and Indian War [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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French and Indian War 2 French and Indian War France had been consolidating her hold on parts of North America since 1608, one year after the founding of Jamestown, when the explorer and geographer Samuel de Champlain founded Quebec. From that settlement, the French expanded their territory so that by Champlain’s death in 1635 they controlled the St. Lawrence River and were poised to take possession of the Great Lakes. However, hard times fell on the French colonization efforts, and New France, as the area came to be known, remained chronically weak. The unfriendly climate and barren soil of eastern Canada were no drawing card, and Frenchmen seemed reluctant to leave France for the New World. Religious dissenters were forbidden to emigrate to Canada, and the whole colonial administration was hindered by a home government that interfered in all phases of colonial activity. Despite these difficulties, the French had great success as explorers and traders. They worked well with the Indians, willingly acquiring Indian ways and wives, factors that proved of significant military and economic value. Indians procured furs for them, fought battles against the British for them, and served as guides on expeditions all throughout the central part of North America. With Indian help, France could claim most of interior America and thus constitute a threat to British colonial security. But only 7,000 French lived in North America in 1700,
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French and Indian War 3 and this meant for Canada an increased dependence on France for food and protection and more of that meddlesome French bureaucracy. (Eder, Markus 2004) The historian Francis Parkman, writing in the nineteenth century, summed it up: ‘‘It was the nature of French colonization to seize upon detached strategic points and hold them by the bayonet, forming no agricultural base, but attracting the Indians by trade and holding them by conversion. A musket, a rosary, and a pack of beaver skins may serve to represent it, and in fact, it consisted of little else.’’ Before 1660, there had been no serious conflict between the French and British in North America. Between 1689 and 1815, however, these two countries fought a series of seven wars. Why? The reasons for this long era of conflict lay partly in the general European rivalry over the balance of power (in all of these wars, other nations fought with Britain and France), partly in the basic conflict of interest produced by rival systems of mercantilism, and partly in direct colonial conflicts. (T. Slaughter, 2000) Both Britain and France looked upon their colonies as integral and exceedingly valuable sectors of their whole national economies; colonial trade for each nation by the early eighteenth century amounted to nearly one- third of its entire foreign commerce, and the wealth of the
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French and Indian War 4 influential merchant classes in both countries was due largely
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MANAGEMENT EM-14793 taught by Professor Lindaryaan during the Spring '08 term at Windsor.

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French_and_Indian_Wa - French and Indian War Running head FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR 1 French and Indian War[Authors Name[Institutions Name French and

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