5671838_R__FrenchIndianWar_

5671838_R__FrenchIndianWar_ - French and Indian War Running...

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French and Indian War 1 Running head: FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR French and Indian War [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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French and Indian War 2 French and Indian War The Enlightenment thought of the late 17th and early 18th centuries of great significance to the settlers in the North American colonies because the subsequent history of the United States suggests that Enlightenment offers other, more positive, benefits. For example, it has helped provide room for policy experimentation and innovation. Faced with new issues and problems, each state adopted differing policies, and those policies that proved most successful were then adopted more widely. Moreover, as the United States expanded westward and incorporated vast expanses of territory with very different natural resources and forms of economic development, it became increasingly difficult to conceive how a single, centralized unitary government would be workable. Some form of territorial devolution was clearly necessary, and the system of Enlightenment adopted by the North-American colonies served this purpose very well. So there are many reasons, unrelated to ethno-cultural diversity, why a country would adopt Enlightenment. Indeed, any liberal democracy that contains a large and diverse territory will surely be pushed in the direction of adopting some form of Enlightenment, regardless of its ethno-cultural composition. The virtues of Enlightenment for large-scale democracies are manifested, not only in the United States, but also in
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French and Indian War 3 Australia, Brazil, and Germany. In each of these cases, Enlightenment is firmly entrenched, and widely endorsed, even though none of the federal units are intended to enable ethno- cultural groups to be self-governing. The idea of progress was central to many Enlightenment theorists. One of the fundamental principles of the Enlightenment is the emancipation of individuals from ascribed roles and identities. Individuals should be free to judge for themselves, in the light of their own reasoning and experience, which traditional beliefs and customary practices are worth maintaining. Enlightment liberates people from fixed social roles and traditional identities, and fosters an ideal of autonomous individuality that encourages individuals to choose for themselves what sort of life they want to lead. (Eder, Markus 2004) Theorists thought that cosmopolitanism would be the natural and inevitable outcome of this emancipation of the individual. While people are born into particular ethnic, religious, or
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5671838_R__FrenchIndianWar_ - French and Indian War Running...

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