9464871__Management_and_Leadership_

9464871_Management_ - Management and Leadership Running head MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP 10 Management and Leadership[Authors Name[Institutions Name

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Management and Leadership 10 Running head: MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP Management and Leadership [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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Management and Leadership 10 Management and Leadership In this paper, I have selected General Electric as an organization which believes more on leadership functions instead of mere management. To consider properly the work of the manager, it is necessary to put the function of management in context within an organization. As a matter of fact, leadership is the oldest (organizational) profession. Management is the second oldest. The heads of the first social groups led because they possessed the following kinds of personal characteristics—they were the biggest, strongest, smartest, the best dressed. And, they were believed to have the ear of the gods. Today most people would associate these characteristics with leadership. It was only later, when social groups became larger and more complex, that these head people began to move away from this personal kind of leadership to impersonal, objective management of the group’s resources. At General Electric, professional management has come of age. The past years have seen professionalism come to the management of all of our industrial institutions. As expected, the precedent of this recent history conditions much of the current thinking about leadership. Generally, a number of attempts have been made to break down and define the work of leaders and set up a model of management. In the late nineteenth century, the sociologist Max
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Management and Leadership 10 Weber, after extensive study, offered the bureaucratic model as the best system of management for the rapidly expanding German economy. At the turn of the twentieth century, Henri Fayol, after studying the best organizations, reduced the work of managers to a series of universal laws. In 1937 Luther Gulick and Lyndall Urwick summarized the work of the manager into seven universal functions, like planning, budgeting and decision making. The problem with these, and many other attempts to define the function of leadership in terms of the manager’s work, is that they emphasize that one aspect of the overall task to the exclusion of the complete picture. Management alone gives only a vague indication of the actual work of leaders. Simple observation supports a contention that leaders do not merely plan, direct and budget. In studies of general managers conducted by Anon (2000), he found that they spent much of their time interacting orally with others. The manager’s activities were often unplanned and the result of diversions such as unscheduled meetings and telephone calls. (Anon 2000) The conversations tended to be short, disjointed and to touch on a number of issues. These observational data support the idea that acting in their role allows managers to influence the actions of others in more than just functional, systemic or procedural ways.
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Management and Leadership 10 Now coming back to General Electric, understanding the role
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MANAGEMENT EM-14793 taught by Professor Lindaryaan during the Spring '08 term at Windsor.

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9464871_Management_ - Management and Leadership Running head MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP 10 Management and Leadership[Authors Name[Institutions Name

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