8833944__Shakespeare_

8833944__Shakespeare_ - Authors Last Name 1 [Authors Name]...

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Author’s Last Name 1 [Author’s Name] [Professor’s Name] [Course title] [Date] Shakespeare What Shakespeare thought about the subject of violence is not that visible as we really expect this. Yes, the elements of atrocities are quite rampant in Shakespeare’s works; we can never claim that these plays were violent in nature though appeared as being violent in some inevitable situation where evil and goodness are facing each other. One of the dangers inherent in doing a history play is the misreading of Shakespeare’s presentation of the complex social and political function of violence. Actors quite naturally share the audience’s tendency to lump all monarchs into one type of authority and violent power, while Shakespeare and his contemporaries were well aware of the variations to be found in history and even within the long reign of Elizabeth, who experienced quite a different hold upon her council and courtiers at different times in her forty-five years on the throne. (Boris, Edna Z. 21-22) We tend to have only a vague understanding of the limits placed upon violent power as practiced by royals, assuming that a king can shout, “Off with his head!” like Richard III or the Queen of Hearts, not realizing the gamble being taken by Richard or Henry V in ordering the summary
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MANAGEMENT EM-14793 taught by Professor Lindaryaan during the Spring '08 term at Windsor.

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8833944__Shakespeare_ - Authors Last Name 1 [Authors Name]...

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